Ibn Nusayr

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Abu Shu'ayb Muhammad ibn Nusayr,[1] was a disciple of the tenth Twelver Shi'a Imam, Ali al Hadi and of the eleventh Imam, Hasan al Askari (d. 873). Ibn Nusayr was known to his companions as a representative (Bab) of al-Askari and of the twelfth Imam, Muhammad al-Mahdi during the Minor Occultation.[2][3] A rival of his in claiming to be the Bab (door) to the Imams was Abu Yaqub Ishaq, founder of the Ishaqiyya.[4]

The followers of Ibn Nusayr are known as, Nusairyoon/Nosayris/Nusayris[5] (Arabic: نصيريون‎) or, since the 1920s, Alawi (Arabic: علوي‎).[6] One should note that the term Nusayri now has a negative connotation, as the Islamic State Group employs the term to promote the genocide of Alawites.

He was of Persian origin, but was associated with the Arab al-Namir tribe.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Encyclopedia Iranica, "MOḤAMMAD B. NOṢAYR"
  2. ^ An Introduction the Modern Middle East: History, Religion, Political Economy ... - David S. Sorenson - Google Boeken. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  3. ^ The Voyage and the Messenger: Iran and Philosophy - Henry Corbin - Google Boeken. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2013-01-04. 
  4. ^ Matti Moosa (1987). Extremist Shiites: The Ghulat Sects. Syracuse University Press. p. 267. ISBN 9780815624110. 
  5. ^ Encyclopedia Iranica, "NOṢAYRIS"
  6. ^ Matti Moosa (1987). Extremist Shiites: The Ghulat Sects. Syracuse University Press. p. 262. ISBN 9780815624110. 
  7. ^ Matti Moosa (1987). Extremist Shiites: The Ghulat Sects. Syracuse University Press. p. 259. ISBN 9780815624110.