Ibrāhīm al-Fazārī

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Ibrahim al-Fazari (d. 777 CE) was an 8th-century mathematician and astronomer at the Abbasid court of the Caliph Harun al-Rashid. He should not to be confused with his son Muḥammad ibn Ibrāhīm al-Fazārī, also an Astronomer. He composed various astronomical writings ("on the astrolabe", "on the armillary spheres", "on the calendar").

The Caliph ordered him and his son to translate the Indian Astronomical text, The Sindhind along with Yaʿqūb ibn Ṭāriq, which was completed in Baghdad about 750 CE, and entitled Az-Zīj ‛alā Sinī al-‛Arab.[1] This translation was possibly the vehicle by means of which the Hindu numerals were transmitted from India to Iran.

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Notes[edit]

  1. ^ E. S. Kennedy, A Survey of Islamic Astronomical Tables, (Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, New Series, 46, 2), Philadelphia, 1956, pp. 2, 7, 12 (zijes no. 2, 28, 71).

Further reading[edit]

  • H. Suter: Die Mathematiker und Astronomer der Araber (3, 208, 1900)
  • Richard Nelson Frye: The Golden Age of Persia

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