Id Kah Mosque

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For the mosque in Afghanistan, see Id Gah Mosque
Id Kah Mosque
Kashgar-mezquita-id-kah-d01.jpg
Basic information
Location China Kashgar, China
Geographic coordinates 39°28′20″N 75°59′03″E / 39.47227°N 75.984106°E / 39.47227; 75.984106Coordinates: 39°28′20″N 75°59′03″E / 39.47227°N 75.984106°E / 39.47227; 75.984106
Affiliation Islam
Region Xinjiang
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Mosque
Architectural description
Architect(s) Saqsiz Mirza
Architectural type Mosque
Completed 1442
Specifications
Capacity 20,000
Minaret(s) 3

The Id Kah mosque (Uyghur: ھېيتگاھ مەسچىتىHéytgah Meschit, Chinese: 艾提尕尔; pinyin: àitígǎěr) (from Persian: عیدگاه Eidgāh, meaning Place of Festivities) is a mosque located in Kashgar, Xinjiang, in the western People's Republic of China.

History[edit]

It is the largest mosque in China. Every Friday, it houses nearly 10,000 worshippers and may accommodate up to 20,000.[1]

The mosque was built by Saqsiz Mirza in ca. 1442 (although it incorporated older structures dating back to 996) and covers 16,800 square meters.

In 1933, on August 9, the Chinese Muslim General Ma Zhancang killed and beheaded the Uighur leader Timur Beg, displaying his head on a spike at Id Kah mosque.[2][3][4][5]

In March 1934, it was reported that the uighur emir Abdullah Bughra was also beheaded, the head being displayed at Id Kah mosque.[6][7]

In April 1934, the Chinese Muslim general Ma Zhongying gave a speech at Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, telling the Uighurs to be loyal to the Republic of China Kuomintang government at Nanjing.[8][9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter Neville-Hadley. Frommer's China. Frommer's, 2003. ISBN 076456755. Page 302.
  2. ^ S. Frederick Starr (2004). Xinjiang: China's Muslim borderland. M.E. Sharpe. p. 77. ISBN 0-7656-1318-2. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  3. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. Columbia University Press. p. 198. ISBN 0-231-13924-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  4. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 93. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  5. ^ The British newspaper The Times reported that a turki chief was beheaded on August 25, 1933
  6. ^ Christian Tyler (2004). Wild West China: the taming of Xinjiang. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p. 116. ISBN 0-8135-3533-6. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  7. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 123. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  8. ^ S. Frederick Starr (2004). Xinjiang: China's Muslim borderland. M.E. Sharpe. p. 79. ISBN 0-7656-1318-2. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  9. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. Columbia University Press. p. 200. ISBN 0-231-13924-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  10. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 124. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 

External links[edit]