Idabel, Oklahoma

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Idabel, Oklahoma
City
Idabel City Hall
Idabel City Hall
Nickname(s): Dogwood Capital of Oklahoma
Location of Idabel, Oklahoma
Location of Idabel, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 33°53′47″N 94°49′45″W / 33.89639°N 94.82917°W / 33.89639; -94.82917Coordinates: 33°53′47″N 94°49′45″W / 33.89639°N 94.82917°W / 33.89639; -94.82917
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County McCurtain
Area
 • Total 15.9 sq mi (41.3 km2)
 • Land 15.9 sq mi (41.3 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 472 ft (144 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 7,010
 • Density 440.9/sq mi (169.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 74745
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-36750[1]
GNIS feature ID 1101480[1]

Idabel is a town in McCurtain County in southeastern Oklahoma, United States. The population was 7,010 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of McCurtain County.[2] The town is located in the tourist area known as Kiamichi Country.

History[edit]

Part of downtown Idabel
Martha A. Johnson Library in Idabel

Idabel was established in 1902 by the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway (later part of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway (Frisco). The city was first named Purnell, after Isaac Purnell, a railroad official. When postal officials rejected that designation, the name was changed to Mitchell, honoring another railroad company officer. Postal officials also rejected because another post office of that name existed elsewhere in the territory. They named the post office Bokhoma (a Choctaw word meaning Red River), which opened December 15, 1902. Railroad officials then chose the name Idabel, a compound of the names of Isaac Purnell's two daughters, Ida and Bell. The post office was then renamed Idabel.[3]

For its first four years, Idabel local government was the responsibility of the Choctaw tribe for the Indians themselves. The national government was responsible for enforcing the law among non-Choctaws. In 1906, the citizens elected thei first mayor and established a mayor-council form of government. At the time of statehood, November 16, 1907, the town was designated as the county seat of McCurtain County. A census in that year reported 726 residents. By 1910, the population had grown to 1,493. In 1920, there were 3,617 residents, but the number fell to 2,581 in 1930. Growth resumed by the end of the Great Depression in the late 1930s.[3]

Initially, timber was the basis for the local economy, but this was supplanted by cotton production after the nearby forests were cleared. One cotton gin operated in Idabel in 1904, but six were in business in 1930. However, the Great Depression, depleted soil and destructive pests essentially wiped out this industry around Idabel. Landowners converted their properties to pastures and expanded beef production. Chicken farms were also established in the area and marginal agricultural land was turned into pine plantations.[3]

Geography[edit]

Idabel is located at 33°53′47″N 94°49′45″W / 33.89639°N 94.82917°W / 33.89639; -94.82917 (33.896299, -94.829238).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.9 square miles (41 km2), of which, 15.9 square miles (41 km2) of it is land and 0.06% is water.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Idabel has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[5]

Climate data for Idabel, Oklahoma
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 52.1
(11.2)
56.9
(13.8)
66.1
(18.9)
74.5
(23.6)
81.3
(27.4)
88.2
(31.2)
92.5
(33.6)
92.7
(33.7)
85.9
(29.9)
76.8
(24.9)
65.1
(18.4)
55.4
(13)
74.0
(23.3)
Average low °F (°C) 27.8
(−2.3)
31.8
(−0.1)
40.5
(4.7)
49.6
(9.8)
58.0
(14.4)
65.8
(18.8)
69.4
(20.8)
68.3
(20.2)
61.9
(16.6)
50.0
(10)
39.8
(4.3)
31.2
(−0.4)
49.5
(9.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.7
(69)
3.5
(89)
4.9
(124)
4.4
(112)
5.9
(150)
4.3
(109)
3.3
(84)
2.6
(66)
4.2
(107)
4.5
(114)
4.1
(104)
3.7
(94)
48.1
(1,222)
Source #1: weather.com
Source #2: Weatherbase.com [6]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
2000 7,658
2010 7,010 −8.5%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 7,658 people, 2,735 households, and 1,785 families residing in the city. The population density was 436.3 people per square mile (168.5/km²). There were 3,129 housing units at an average density of 196.4 per square mile (75.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 56.99% White, 24.45% African American, 10.44% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 3.37% from other races, and 4.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.96% of the population.

There were 2,735 households out of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.6% were married couples living together, 21.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 85.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $20,496, and the median income for a family was $24,189. Males had a median income of $24,182 versus $16,958 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,241. About 28.7% of families and 31.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.5% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Idabel train station
The former State Theater, across from the courthouse in Idabel, houses a law office, the Legal Arts Building.
McCurtain Daily Gazette office in Idabel

Public schools[edit]

  • Idabel High School - Grades 9–12
  • Idabel Middle School - Grades 6–8
  • Central Elementary - Grades 3–5
  • Idabel Primary South - Grades 1–2 PRE-K- K
  • EvenStart - Ages 2–4
  • Southeast Elementary - pre-k–4–Adult Ed
  • Denison Elementary - Pre-Kindergarten - 8th

Advanced education[edit]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c Coleman, Louis. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Idabel." Retrieved August 29, 2012.[1]
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Climate Summary for Idabel, Oklahoma
  6. ^ "Historical Weather for Idabel, Oklahoma, United States". 
  7. ^ Countess Vaughn, Internet Movie Database. (accessed October 14, 2013)
  8. ^ All About Jazz - Hadley Caliman
  9. ^ The 10 Best and Worst One-Game Careers in NFL History, Bleacher Report. (accessed October 14, 2013)
  10. ^ Tesla, Allmusic.com. (accessed October 13, 2013)

External links[edit]