Idaho County, Idaho

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Idaho County, Idaho
Seal of Idaho County, Idaho
Seal
Map of Idaho highlighting Idaho County
Location in the state of Idaho
Map of the United States highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the U.S.
Founded February 4, 1864
Named for A steamer called Idaho that was launched on the Columbia River in 1860
Seat Grangeville
Largest city Grangeville
Area
 • Total 8,503 sq mi (22,023 km2)
 • Land 8,477 sq mi (21,955 km2)
 • Water 26 sq mi (67 km2), 0.3%
Population
 • (2010) 16,267
 • Density 1.9/sq mi (1/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zones Pacific: UTC-8/-7
North of Salmon River
Mountain: UTC-7/-6
South of Salmon River
Website idahocounty.org

Idaho County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,267.[1] The county seat is Grangeville.[2] Previous county seats of the area were Florence (1864–75) and Mount Idaho (1875–1902).

Idaho County was originally founded as a region of Washington Territory in 1861, named for a steamer called Idaho that was launched on the Columbia River in 1860. It was reorganized by the Idaho Territorial Legislature on February 4, 1864. In this context, the name of the county predates both the Idaho Territory and the State of Idaho.

Idaho County is one of seven counties in the United States that has the same name as the state in which it lies. The other six are Arkansas, Hawaii, Iowa, New York, Oklahoma, and Utah.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 8,503 square miles (22,020 km2), of which 8,477 square miles (21,960 km2) is land and 26 square miles (67 km2) (0.3%) is water.[3] It is the largest county by area in Idaho.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

There are 4,431,720 acres (17,934.535 km², or 6,924.563 sq mi) of National Forest land within the county, more than in any county (or borough) outside of Alaska. National Forests and their acreage within the county are: Nez Perce National Forest 2,224,091; Clearwater National Forest 870,807; Payette National Forest 804,853; Bitterroot National Forest 464,108; Salmon National Forest 66,074; and Wallowa National Forest 1,787. The Nez Perce National Forest is located entirely within the county's borders, and is the largest National Forest lying within a single county.[4]

Time zones[edit]

Further information: Time in Idaho

Idaho County is one of the few counties in the United States with two time zones, divided by the Salmon River. Most of the county is in the Pacific Time Zone, but those areas south of the Salmon River are in the Mountain Time Zone.

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Airports[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 849
1880 2,031 139.2%
1890 2,955 45.5%
1900 9,121 208.7%
1910 12,384 35.8%
1920 11,759 −5.0%
1930 10,107 −14.0%
1940 12,691 25.6%
1950 11,423 −10.0%
1960 13,542 18.6%
1970 12,891 −4.8%
1980 14,769 14.6%
1990 13,783 −6.7%
2000 15,511 12.5%
2010 16,267 4.9%
Est. 2013 16,116 −0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 15,511 people, 6,084 households, and 4,295 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 7,537 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.12% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 2.89% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.91% from other races, and 1.72% from two or more races. 1.57% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 29.7% were of German, 12.9% American, 11.7% English and 9.0% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 6,084 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.80% were married couples living together, 6.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.40% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.00% under the age of 18, 6.30% from 18 to 24, 23.30% from 25 to 44, 28.40% from 45 to 64, and 17.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 103.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,515, and the median income for a family was $33,919. Males had a median income of $28,383 versus $18,214 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,411. About 12.50% of families and 16.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.00% of those under age 18 and 10.00% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Images[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ Table 6 – NFS Acreage by State, Congressional District, and County, 30 September 2008
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°51′N 115°28′W / 45.85°N 115.46°W / 45.85; -115.46