ifMUD

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ifMUD
ifMUD Logo
Developer(s) Liza Daly and project community
Engine PerlMUD
Platform(s) Platform independent
Release date(s) 1997
Genre(s) Interactive fiction MUD
Mode(s) Multiplayer
Distribution Online

ifMUD is a MUD associated with the rec.arts.int-fiction newsgroup accessible via telnet or a MUD client. It is central to the interactive fiction community, frequented by many of the genre's best-known writers.[1][2] Every year, the XYZZY Awards are hosted on ifMUD during an online ceremony.[3]

ifMUD was founded in 1997 by Liza Daly.[1] It is written in the Perl computer programming language making use of an extensive hack of the earlier PerlMUD, with many additional features.[1]

Game characteristics[edit]

ifMUD is organized into areas, with a distinct area usually the work of a particular contributor or group of contributors and having its own interactive fiction plot. For example, Save Princeton was created by Jacob Weinstein and Karine Schaefer.[4]

MUD bots[edit]

Two major bots exist on ifMUD, Alex and Floyd.

Floyd acts as an interpreter for many different IF writing platforms. It was named after a fictional character from the Planetfall game by Infocom.

Alex, a "parrot" bot named after Alex Pepperberg, keeps track of memos on any topic, editable by anyone, similar to a wiki. It was written by Dan Shiovitz and was inspired by the Perl infobot Purl.

Reception[edit]

ifMUD has, at times, simultaneously been praised for its service to the interactive fiction community and criticized for fostering an excessively self-referential, socially impenetrable environment.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Granade, Stephen. "Brass Lantern IF and a MUD". Retrieved 2010-04-08. There is a place on the Internet where fans of adventure games gather. They meet other fans; they occasionally run into the people behind the bylines on games. [...] ifMUD is the brainchild of Liza Daly. Over the years it has moved servers; its codebase has been hacked until it only vaguely resembles the PerlMUD source from which it sprang. It has simmered since its introduction in June of 1997, a blend of personalities and ideas. 
  2. ^ Montfort, Nick (2005-04-01). Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction. The MIT Press. pp. xv. ISBN 0-262-63318-3. I also appreciate the many conversations I have had about interactive fiction topics with friends from an enjoyable and topical online community, ifMUD. 
  3. ^ Montfort, Nick; Ashwell, Sam Kabo; Cornelson, Dave; Shiovitz, Dan (2005-04-08). "Interactive Fiction FAQ". Interactive Fiction: Other Poetic and Imaginative Writing for the Computer and Writing on Digital Media Topics. Retrieved 2010-09-01. 
  4. ^ Göbel, Stefan (2003). Proceeding of the Technologies for Interactive Digital Storytelling and Entertainment (TIDSE) Conference, 2003. Fraunhofer IRB. p. 366. Fig. 1 shows a map created by one interactor on a piece of paper while playing Jacob Weinstein and Karine Schaefer's Save Princeton cooperatively on ifMUD [...] 
  5. ^ O'Brien, Paul (2006-07-19). "Pass the Banana". ifreviews.org. Interactive Fiction Reviews Organization. Retrieved 2010-09-01. 

External links[edit]