Ike Hilliard

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Ike Hilliard
No. 19, 88     Washington Redskins
Wide receivers coach
Wide receiver
Personal information
Date of birth: (1976-04-05) April 5, 1976 (age 38)
Place of birth: Patterson, Louisiana
Height: 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) Weight: 210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: Patterson (LA)
College: Florida
NFL Draft: 1997 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Debuted in 1997 for the New York Giants
Last played in 2008 for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Career history
 As player:
 As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played 161
Games started 105
Receptions 546
Receiving yards 6,397
Touchdowns 35
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Isaac Jason Hilliard (born April 5, 1976), nicknamed Ike Hilliard, is an American former college and professional football player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons during the 1990s and 2000s. He played college football for the University of Florida, and earned All-American honors. He was a first-round pick in the 1997 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the New York Giants and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the NFL. After his playing career, Hilliard became a professional football coach, and he is currently the wide receivers coach for the NFL's Washington Redskins.

Early years[edit]

Hilliard was born in Patterson, Louisiana in 1976.[1] He attended Patterson High School,[2] where he was a star high school football player for the Patterson Lumberjacks.

College career[edit]

Hilliard accepted an athletic scholarship to attend the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he played wide receiver for coach Steve Spurrier's Florida Gators football team from 1994 to 1996.[3] During his three seasons as a Gator, the team won three SEC Championships in 1994, 1995 and 1996. As a junior in 1996, he was paired with fellow Gators receiver Reidel Anthony and both posted 1,000-yard seasons, and both Hilliard and Anthony were recognized as first-team All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) selections and consensus first-team All-Americans,[3][4] as the Gators won the Bowl Alliance national championship—their first-ever national football title. The Gators finished the season with a record of 12–1 after a 52–20 victory over the top-ranked Florida State Seminoles in the 1997 Sugar Bowl.[5] Memorably, he set three Sugar Bowl records against the Seminoles: he had 150 receiving yards, including an 82-yard touchdown catch, and scored a total of three touchdowns for eighteen points.[3]

Hilliard declared himself eligible for the NFL Draft after his junior season, and finished his college career with 126 receptions for 2,214 yards and twenty-nine touchdowns.[3] In a 2006 series published by The Gainesville Sun, he was recognized as No. 14 among the 100 all-time greatest Gator players from the first century of Florida football.[6] He was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great" in 2009.[7][8]

Professional career[edit]

New York Giants[edit]

The New York Giants chose Hilliard in the first round (seventh pick overall) of the 1997 NFL Draft,[9] and he played his first eight seasons for the Giants from 1997 to 2004.[10] He became a regular starter in 1998,[10] helping the Giants reach Super Bowl XXXV following the 2000 regular season. He finished his career with the Giants with 368 receptions for 4,630 yards and twenty-seven touchdowns.[1]

Tampa Bay Buccaneers[edit]

Hilliard signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after the 2004 season. During his first two seasons with Tampa, he was used mainly as a third or fourth receiver, but in 2007 he started ten games making sixty-two receptions for 722 yards.[10] Hilliard was released by the Buccaneers on February 25, 2009.[11] Hilliard finished his NFL career with 546 catches for 6,397 yards and thirty-five touchdowns.[10]

In his twelve-season NFL career, Hilliard appeared in 161 regular season games, started 105 of them, and made 546 catches for 6,396 yards and thirty-five touchdowns.[1] He also had 126 rushing yards on sixteen attempts.[1]

NFL statistics[edit]

Receiving Statistics[12]

Year Team Games Receptions Yards Yards per Reception Longest Reception Touchdowns First Downs Fumbles Fumbles Lost
1997 NYG 2 2 42 21.0 23 0 2 0 0
1998 NYG 16 51 715 14.0 50 2 29 2 2
1999 NYG 16 72 996 13.8 46 3 50 0 0
2000 NYG 14 55 787 14.3 59 8 44 0 0
2001 NYG 14 52 659 12.7 38 6 36 0 0
2002 NYG 7 27 386 14.3 38 2 21 0 0
2003 NYG 13 60 608 10.1 38 6 38 2 2
2004 NYG 16 49 437 8.9 43 0 22 3 1
2005 TB 16 35 282 8.1 22 1 24 0 0
2006 TB 16 34 339 10.0 44 2 19 0 0
2007 TB 15 62 722 11.6 56 1 37 2 2
2008 TB 16 47 424 9.0 36 4 31 1 1
Career 161 546 6,397 11.7 59 35 353 10 8

Returning Statistics[12]

Year Team Games Punt Return Attempts Punt Return Yards Punts Returned for Touchdown Punts Fair Caught Longest Punt Return Kickoff Return Attempts Kickoff Return Yards Kickoffs Returned for Touchdown Kickoffs Fair Caught Longest Kickoff Return
2004 NYG 16 4 26 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0
2006 TB 16 24 163 0 3 16 0 0 0 0 0
2007 TB 15 15 92 0 4 20 1 3 0 0 3
2008 TB 16 3 19 0 7 11 0 0 0 0 0
Career 63 46 300 0 14 20 1 3 0 0 3

Rushing Statistics[12]

Year Team Games Carries Yards Yards per Carry Longest Carry Touchdowns First Downs Fumbles Fumbles Lost
1998 NYG 16 1 4 4.0 4 0 0 0 0
1999 NYG 16 3 16 5.3 24 0 1 0 0
2000 NYG 14 3 19 6.3 17 0 1 0 0
2001 NYG 14 1 21 21.0 21 0 1 0 0
2002 NYG 7 1 7 7.0 7 0 0 0 0
2003 NYG 13 2 19 9.5 13 0 1 0 0
2004 NYG 16 3 34 11.3 17 0 2 0 0
2007 TB 15 1 6 6.0 6 0 0 0 0
2008 TB 16 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0
Career 161 16 126 7.9 24 0 6 0 0

Coaching career[edit]

Forced to retire after a neck injury, Hilliard became a volunteer receivers coach for the UFL's Florida Tuskers in 2009. In 2010, he became the Tuskers' new wide receivers coach for the coming season.

In 2011, Hilliard returned to the NFL as an assistant wide receivers coach for the Miami Dolphins, followed by the Washington Redskins in 2012, and the Buffalo Bills in 2013. He was named the wide receivers coach of the Washington Redskins of the NFL for the second time in January 2014.

Personal[edit]

Hilliard is the nephew of former New Orleans Saints running back Dalton Hilliard.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Pro-Football-Reference.com, Players, Ike Hilliard. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  2. ^ databaseFootball.com, Players, Ike Hilliard. Retrieved June 3, 2010
  3. ^ a b c d 2011 Florida Gators Football Media Guide, University Athletic Association, Gainesville, Florida, pp. 76, 77–79, 85, 88, 93, 97, 127, 143–145, 147–148, 152, 162, 168–169, 174, 182 (2011). Retrieved August 29, 2011.
  4. ^ 2012 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, pp. 10 & 14 (2012). Retrieved September 14, 2012.
  5. ^ College Football Data Warehouse, Steve Spurrier Records by Year, 1996. Retrieved June 3, 2010.
  6. ^ Robbie Andreu & Pat Dooley, "No. 14 Ike Hilliard," The Gainesville Sun (August 20, 2006). Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  7. ^ F Club, Hall of Fame, Gator Greats. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  8. ^ "Eight 2009 Honorees Inducted Into UF Athletic Hall of Fame," GatorZone.com (April 17, 2009). Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  9. ^ Pro Football Hall of Fame, Draft History, 1997 National Football League Draft. Retrieved June 3, 2010.
  10. ^ a b c d National Football League, Historical Players, Ike Hilliard. Retrieved June 3, 2010.
  11. ^ "Bucs Release Derrick Brooks, 4 Others," Yahoo Sports (February 25, 2009). Retrieved February 25, 2009.
  12. ^ a b c "Ike Hilliard Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Carlson, Norm, University of Florida Football Vault: The History of the Florida Gators, Whitman Publishing, LLC, Atlanta, Georgia (2007). ISBN 0-7948-2298-3.
  • Golenbock, Peter, Go Gators! An Oral History of Florida's Pursuit of Gridiron Glory, Legends Publishing, LLC, St. Petersburg, Florida (2002). ISBN 0-9650782-1-3.
  • Hairston, Jack, Tales from the Gator Swamp: A Collection of the Greatest Gator Stories Ever Told, Sports Publishing, LLC, Champaign, Illinois (2002). ISBN 1-58261-514-4.
  • McCarthy, Kevin M., Fightin' Gators: A History of University of Florida Football, Arcadia Publishing, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina (2000). ISBN 978-0-7385-0559-6.
  • Nash, Noel, ed., The Gainesville Sun Presents The Greatest Moments in Florida Gators Football, Sports Publishing, Inc., Champaign, Illinois (1998). ISBN 1-57167-196-X.