Corriere della Sera

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Corriere della Sera
Corriere della Sera.svg
20090715 corsera frontpage.jpg
Front page on 15 July 2009
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) RCS MediaGroup
Editor Ferruccio De Bortoli
Founded 15 March 1876; 138 years ago (1876-03-15)
Political alignment Independent
Liberal
Centrist
Language Italian
Headquarters Milan, Italy
Circulation 358,617 (December 2013)[1]
ISSN 1120-4982
Official website www.corriere.it
The headquarters in Milan.

The Corriere della Sera (Italian pronunciation: [koˈrjere ˈdella ˈsera]; English: Evening Courier) is an Italian daily newspaper published in Milan, with an average daily circulation of 358,000 copies.[1]

First published on 5 March 1876, Corriere della Sera is one of Italy's oldest newspapers.[2] Its main competitors are Rome's la Repubblica and Turin's La Stampa.[3]

In 2004, Corriere della Sera launched an online English section focusing on Italian current affairs and culture. It is one of the most visited Italian language news websites, attracting over 1.6 million readers everyday.[4]

History[edit]

Corriere della Sera was founded on Sunday 5 March 1876 by Eugenio Torelli Viollier.[2] In the 1910s and 1920s, under the direction of Luigi Albertini, it became the most widely read newspaper in Italy, maintaining its importance and influence into the present century.[2]

The newspaper's headquarters have been in the same buildings since the beginning of the 20th century, and therefore it is popularly known as "the Via Solferino newspaper" after the street where it is still located. As the name indicates, it was originally an evening paper.

The Italian novelist Dino Buzzati was a journalist at the Corriere della Sera. Other notable contributors include Eugenio Montale, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Italo Calvino, Alberto Moravia, Amos Oz, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Giovanni Spadolini, Oriana Fallaci, Brunella Gasperini, Dino Buzzati, Enzo Biagi, Indro Montanelli and Paolo Mieli. The "Third Page" (a one page-survey dedicated to culture) used to feature a main article named Elzeviro, which over the years has been signed by all the editors as well as major novelists, poets and journalists.

In the 1960s Corriere della Sera became part of the Rizzoli group, listed in the Italian stock exchange. Its main shareholders are Mediobanca, the Fiat group and some of the biggest industrial and financial groups in Italy.

In 1981 the newspaper was laterally involved in the P2 scandal, when it was discovered that the secret Freemason lodge had the newspaper's editor Franco Di Bella and the former owner Angelo Rizzoli on its member lists.

Contributors (past and present)[edit]

Editors

  • Ferruccio De Bortoli (Editor)
  • Paolo Ermini (Vice-Editor)
  • Magdi Allam (Vice-Editor "ad personam")
  • Pierluigi Battista (Deputy Editor)
  • Dario Di Vico (Deputy Editor)
  • Luciano Fontana (Deputy Editor)
  • Lando Ferretti (former editor)

Columnist & Journalists

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Data from Accertamenti Diffusione Stampa
  2. ^ a b c "Palazzo Corriere della Sera". milano.it. Retrieved 23 October 2013. 
  3. ^ Lapo Filistrucchi (August 2004). "The Impact of Internet on the Market for Daily Newspapers in Italy". European University Institute. Retrieved 8 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "Ciao, Italia! Corriere della Sera Joins European Network". Der Spiegel. Retrieved 23 October 2013. "The Milan-based daily, with an average of 1.6 million online readers every day, has been publishing news in English on Italian current affairs and culture online since 2004. Through its new partnership with publications with strong reputations for quality journalism elsewhere in Europe, Corriere della Sera will contribute news and perspectives on Italy and Europe from its English-language " Italian Life" section." 

External links[edit]