Il Resto del Carlino

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il Resto del Carlino
Ilrestodelcarlino.gif
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid
Owner(s) Monrif
RCS MediaGroup
Publisher Poligrafici Editoriale
Founded 21 March 1885; 130 years ago (1885-03-21)
Political alignment Independent
Conservatism
Language Italian
Headquarters Bologna, Italy
Circulation 165,207 (2008)
Sister newspapers La Nazione
Website http://www.ilrestodelcarlino.it/

il Resto del Carlino is an Italian newspaper based in Bologna, and is one of the oldest newspapers in Italy. Its rather evocative name means "the change you get from a Carlino," the smallest part of the Papal baiocco, which was legal tender at the time, when a sheet of local news was given out in shops to make up for any change owing after buying a cigar.

History and profile[edit]

il Resto del Carlino was established in 1885.[1][2] The founder was Amilcare Zamorani.[3] In 1988 the owner of the paper was Monrif.[4] In 2004 the owners were Monrif (59.2 %) and the RCS MediaGroup (9.9%).[5] The publisher of the paper is Poligrafici Editoriali.[5]

il Resto del Carlino is based in Bologna[1][2] and is published in tabloid format.[6] Its sister newspaper is La Nazione.[5]

Circulation[edit]

The 1988 circulation of il Resto del Carlino was 310,000 copies.[4] Its circulation was 188,000 copies in 2000.[7] The circulation of the paper was 183,513 copies in 2001 and it was 180,098 copies in 2002.[5] The paper had a circulation of 179,000 copies in 2003[6] and 176,277 copies in 2004.[8] It was 168,000 copies in 2007[9] and 165,207 copies in 2008.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Il Resto del Carlino". Monrif Group. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Andrea Keikkala (25 June 2013). "Mario Carnali: Cagli’s Journalist Since 1973". Gonzaga in Cagli. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  3. ^ Fred Skolnik; Michael Berenbaum (2007). Encyclopaedia Judaica: Blu-Cof. Granite Hill Publishers. p. 49. ISBN 978-0-02-865932-9. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Peter Humphreys (1996). Mass Media and Media Policy in Western Europe. Manchester University Press. p. 90. Retrieved 29 October 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d David Ward (2004). "A Mapping Study of Media Concentration and Ownership in Ten European Countries" (PDF). Dutch Media Authority. Retrieved 11 February 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "World Press Trends" (PDF). World Association of Newspapers. Paris. 2004. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  7. ^ "Top 100 dailies 2000". campaign. 16 November 2001. Retrieved 2 March 2015. 
  8. ^ "European Publishing Monitor. Italy" (PDF). Turku School of Economics and KEA. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  9. ^ Anne Austin et. al. (2008). "Western Europe Market and Media Fact" (PDF). ZenithOptimedia. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 
  10. ^ Data for average newspaper circulation. Survey in 2008 in Italy Accertamenti Diffusione Stampa.

External links[edit]