Ilan Halimi

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Ilan Halimi
Born (1982-10-11)11 October 1982
Died 13 February 2006(2006-02-13) (aged 23)[1]
Paris, France
Cause of death
Injuries from torture
Occupation Cell phone salesman

Ilan Halimi (Hebrew: אילן חלימי‎) was a young French Jewish man of Moroccan descent [2] who was kidnapped on 21 January 2006 by a group called the Gang of Barbarians and subsequently tortured, over a period of three weeks, resulting in his death.

Personal life[edit]

Halimi was a cell phone salesman[3] in Paris. He lived there with his divorced mother and his two sisters.

Kidnapping[edit]

Halimi was abducted and taken to Bagneux where he was held captive and tortured for three weeks. A demand for ransom was made to his parents. He was released and found in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois. He died on the way to hospital.

Halimi was initially buried in the Cimetière parisien de Pantin near Paris before being reburied in Har HaMenuchot cemetery in Jerusalem, Israel on February 9, 2007.[4] The funeral in Paris drew a large Jewish crowd.

Aftermath[edit]

More than 1,000 persons marched through the streets of Paris, demanding justice for Ilan Halimi, on Sunday February 26, 2006.[5]

In May 2011, a garden in the 12th arrondissement of Paris was renamed after him. Halimi used to play in this garden as a child.

Paris, Jardin Ilan Halimi, Sign

His mother (Ruth) published a book (written together with Émilie Frèche) about his case: 24 jours: la vérité sur la mort d’Ilan Halimi (Seuil, ISBN 978-2020910286).

References[edit]

  1. ^ König, Yaël (March 20, 2006). "Entretien avec Ruth Halimi" (in (French)). Primo-Europe. Retrieved 2008-12-30. 
  2. ^ Fields, Suzanne (April 3, 2006). "The rising tide of anti-Semitism". The Washington Times. Retrieved 2008-12-30. 
  3. ^ Tale of Torture and Murder Horrifies the Whole of France, Michel Gurfinkiel, The New York Sun, February 22, 2006
  4. ^ Trials and Tribulations, by Brett Kline, (c) JTA, The Jewish Herald, July 24, 2009, pp. 20-23
  5. ^ Article on the European Jewish Press website