Illinois Department of Corrections

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Department of Corrections
IL - DOC.png
Illinois Department of Corrections shoulder patch
Agency overview
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* U.S. state of Illinois, United States
General nature
Operational structure
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) is the code department[1][2] of the Illinois state government that operates the adult state prison system. The IDOC is led by a director appointed by the Governor of Illinois,[3] and its headquarters are in Springfield.[4]

The IDOC was established in 1970, combining the state's prisons, juvenile centers, and parole services. The juvenile corrections system was split off into the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice on July 1, 2006.[3]

Facilities[edit]

Name Highest security
Dixon Psychiatric Unit 1 - Maximum
Menard Correctional Center 1 - Maximum
Pontiac Correctional Center 1 - Maximum
Stateville Correctional Center 1 - Maximum
Hill Correctional Center 2 - Secure Medium
Lawrence Correctional Center 2 - Secure Medium
Pinckneyville Correctional Center 2 - Secure Medium
Western Illinois Correctional Center 2 - Secure Medium
Big Muddy River Correctional Center 3 - High Medium
Danville Correctional Center 3 - High Medium
Dixon Special Treatment Center 3 - High Medium
Illinois River Correctional Center 3 - High Medium
Menard Medium Security Unit 3 - High Medium
Pontiac Medium Security Unit 3 - High Medium
Shawnee Correctional Center 3 - High Medium
Centralia Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Decatur Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Graham Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Lincoln Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Logan Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Sheridan Correctional Center 4 - Medium
Jacksonville Correctional Center 5 - High Minimum
Robinson Correctional Center 5 - High Minimum
Taylorville Correctional Center 5 - High Minimum
East Moline Correctional Center 6 - Minimum
Southwestern Illinois Correctional Center 6 - Minimum
Vandalia Correctional Center 6 - Minimum
Vienna Correctional Center 6 - Minimum
Clayton Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Dixon Springs Impact Incarceration Program 7 - Low Minimum
DuQuoin Impact Incarceration Program 7 - Low Minimum
East Moline Work Camps 1 and 2 7 - Low Minimum
Greene County Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Hardin County Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Kankakee Minimum-Security Unit 7 - Low Minimum
Pittsfield Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Springfield Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Southwestern Illinois Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Stateville Minimum Security Unit 7 - Low Minimum
Vandalia Work Camp 7 - Low Minimum
Crossroads Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
Decatur Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
Fox Valley Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
Jessie "Ma" Houston Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
North Lawndale Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
Peoria Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
Southern Illinois Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional
West Side Adult Transition Center 8 - Transitional

Crossroads and North Lawndale Adult Transition Centers are operated by the Safer Foundation. As of December 2009, Thomson Correctional Center was in the process of being sold to the United States government.

Closed prisons[edit]

Remains of the old Illinois State Prison

Death row[edit]

Illinois had the death penalty until it was abolished in 2011.[5] Illinois last execution was Andrew Kokoraleis, on March 17, 1999.[6]

Pontiac Correctional Center housed the male death row, while Dwight Correctional Center housed the female death row. Prior to the January 11, 2003 commutation of death row sentences, male death row inmates were housed in Pontiac, Menard, and Tamms correctional centers.[7] The execution chamber was at Tamms Correctional Center.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Uphoff, Judy Lee (2012). "The Governor and the Executive Branch". In Lind, Nancy S.; Rankin, Erik. Governing Illinois: Your Connection to State and Local Government (4th ed.). Center Publications, Center for State Policy and Leadership, University of Illinois at Springfield. pp. 78–79. ISBN 978-0-938943-28-0. 
  2. ^ 20 ILCS 5/5-15
  3. ^ a b "IDOC Overview". Springfield, Illinois: Illinois Department of Corrections. Retrieved 2009-12-08. 
  4. ^ "Contacting IDOC." Illinois Department of Corrections. Retrieved on December 7, 2009.
  5. ^ Smith, Matt."Illinois abolishes death penalty." CNN. March 9, 2011.
  6. ^ McKinney, Dave."[1]." CHICAGO SUN TIMES. March 17, 1999.
  7. ^ "DOC Report Online." Illinois Department of Corrections. Retrieved on September 1, 2010.
  8. ^ "Tamms Closed Maximum Security Unit: Ten-Point Plan Brief." Illinois Department of Corrections. 3 (9/51). September 3, 2009. Retrieved on September 1, 2010.

External links[edit]