Im Ye-jin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a Korean name; the family name is Im.
Im Ye-jin
KOCIS Reenactment of a royal wedding on Mar 5, 2012 (6812212740).jpg
Born Im Ki-hee
(1960-01-24) January 24, 1960 (age 54)
Seoul, South Korea
Other names Lim Ye-jin
Yim Ye-jin
Alma mater Dongguk University - Theater and Film
Occupation Actress
Years active 1974–present
Agent YG Entertainment
Spouse(s) Choi Chang-wook (m. 1989)
Korean name
Hangul 임예진
Hanja
Revised Romanization Im Yea-jin
McCune–Reischauer Im Ye-chin
Birth name
Hangul 임기희
Revised Romanization Im Gi-hui
McCune–Reischauer Im Gihŭi

Im Ye-jin (born Im Ki-hee on January 24, 1960) is a South Korean actress. As a teenage actress, she reached the peak of her popularity in the 1970s with the "Really Really" film trilogy, which include Never Forget Me, I Am Really Sorry and I Really Really Like You. She is currently active in television.

Career[edit]

Im Ki-hee began modeling in popular teen magazines when she was in junior high school. Using the stage name Im Ye-jin, she made her acting debut in Kim Ki-young's Transgression in 1974.

In 1975, Im played a high schooler in love with her teacher in Graduating School Girls, for which she won Best New Actress at the Grand Bell Awards. But it was a year later when she would be catapulted to stardom. Im headlined Never Forget Me (also known as Really Really Don't Forget, 1976) and its sequels I Am Really Sorry (also known as I'm Really Really Sorry, 1976) and Crazy For You (also known as I Really Really Like You, 1977) -- movies about teenage friendship, romance and aspirations that became massive box office hits, screening to sold out theaters. In an era when Korean cinema was in a dark period resulting from severe censorship by an authoritarian government, this led to the emergence of the teenage demographic as a major consumer of pop culture. Im had an innocent, girlish image, whose acting was charming and sweet without being saccharine, and she became hugely popular among middle school and high school students; girls wanted to be like her, and boys had her picture in their pockets.[1] The "Really Really" series established Im as the most popular young actress of that period, and for the next several years, youth melodramas starring her dominated the theaters in quick succession, often with Lee Deok-hwa as her leading man: Prayer of a Girl (1976), Ever So Much Good! (1976), I Really Have a Dream (1976), I've Never Felt Like This Before (1976), and Nobody Knows (1977).

Im entered college in 1979, studying Theater and Film at Dongguk University. By this time, she wanted to transition out of teen movies, and into more adult roles. She starred opposite Shin Seong-il in Love Song in a Peanut Shell, but it was poorly received, with audiences not prepared to see her break out of her "pure" image. Despite a supporting role in A Fine, Windy Day, Im's film career was in a slump, so she shifted her focus to television and radio in the 1980s.

After a few years of forgettable television dramas, Im's career was revitalized by Kim Soo-hyun, one of the most famous TV writers in Korea. Among Kim's dramas that Im starred in were 사랑합시다 (1981), Yesterday and Tomorrow (1982), Love and Truth (1984), Love and Ambition (1987), Farewell (1994), and Childless Comfort (2012). In Farewell, she shocked audiences by playing a Fatal Attraction-esque villain for the first time. Im also played the character Dal-soo in a series of one-act dramas for MBC Best Theater from 1995 to 2005.

As Im grew older, she remained active on television and the occasional film, in supporting roles as ajummas, aunts or mothers. As if coming full circle, she played one of the adult characters in a 2010 musical theatre adaptation of her early hit I Really Really Like You.[2][3]

From 2008 to 2010, Im was a popular panelist on the variety show Quiz to Change the World, for which she was recognized at the MBC Entertainment Awards.

In 2014, Im signed with the talent agency YG Entertainment.[4]

Personal life[edit]

In 1989, Im married Choi Chang-wook, a TV director and producer at MBC.

Filmography[edit]

Television drama[edit]

  • Marriage, Not Dating (tvN, 2014)
  • Can We Love? (jTBC, 2014)
  • Miss Korea (MBC, 2013)
  • Princess Aurora (MBC, 2013)
  • 7th Grade Civil Servant (MBC, 2013)
  • Childless Comfort (jTBC, 2012)
  • Immortal Classic (Channel A, 2012)
  • Iron Daughters-in-Law (MBC, 2011)
  • Romance Town (KBS2, 2011)
  • Sweet Palpitations (KBS2, 2011)
  • My Princess (MBC, 2011)
  • Smile, Mom (SBS, 2010)
  • You Don't Know Women (SBS, 2010)
  • Life is Beautiful (SBS, 2010) (cameo)
  • Life is Good (MBC, 2009)
  • Queen Seondeok (MBC, 2009)
  • The Road Home (KBS1, 2009)
  • Boys Before Flowers (KBS2, 2009)
  • Little Mom Scandal - Season 2 (CGV, 2008)
  • Lawyers of the Great Republic of Korea (MBC, 2008)
  • Little Mom Scandal (CGV, 2008)
  • Winter Bird (MBC, 2007)
  • MBC Best Theater "동네 한바퀴" (MBC, 2006)
  • Which Star Are You From (MBC, 2006)
  • Princess Hours (MBC, 2006)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수, 성매매특별법에 걸리다" (MBC, 2005)
  • Love and Sympathy (SBS, 2005)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수, 아들 과외하다" (MBC, 2004)
  • Ireland (MBC, 2004)
  • Full House (KBS2, 2004)
  • People of the Water Flower Village (MBC, 2004)
  • MBC Best Theater "Do 야 love me?" (MBC, 2003)
  • MBC Best Theater "달려라 장 부장" (MBC, 2002)
  • Honest Living (SBS, 2002)
  • Affection (SBS, 2002)
  • Wonderful Days (SBS, 2001)
  • Blue Mist (KBS2, 2001)
  • LA Arirang (SBS, 2000)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수, 부메랑을 맞다" (MBC, 1999)
  • Crush (KBS2, 1998)
  • See and See Again (MBC, 1998)
  • 사랑한다는 것은 (EBS, 1998)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수의 홀로 아리랑" (MBC, 1997)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수, 효도법 어기다" (MBC, 1997)
  • OK Ranch (SBS, 1997)
  • MBC Best Theater "황금빛 정원" (MBC, 1996)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수의 차, 차, 차" (MBC, 1996)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수 아들 학교 가다" (MBC, 1996)
  • Three Kingdoms (KBS2, 1996)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수의 집짓기" (MBC, 1995)
  • MBC Best Theater "달수의 재판" (MBC, 1995)
  • Love and Marriage (MBC, 1995)
  • Partner (MBC, 1994-1997)
  • Farewell (SBS, 1994)
  • Mountain Wind (MBC, 1993)
  • Professor Oh's Family (SBS, 1993)
  • Mozart the Janitor (KBS1, 1992)
  • A Rainy Afternoon (KBS2, 1991)
  • Ancient Geum Jan-di (KBS1, 1991)
  • Freezing Point (KBS2, 1990)
  • 꼴찌 수색대 (MBC, 1990)
  • Sunrise (KBS2, 1989)
  • Legacy (MBC, 1989)
  • 또래와 뚜리 (MBC, 1988)
  • Love and Ambition (MBC, 1987)
  • First Love (MBC, 1986)
  • Love and Truth (MBC, 1984)
  • Sunflower in Winter (MBC, 1983)
  • Friend, My Friend (MBC, 1982)
  • Yesterday and Tomorrow (MBC, 1982)
  • 사랑합시다 (MBC, 1981)
  • Han River (MBC, 1981)
  • Anguk-dong Madam (MBC, 1980)
  • White Dandelion (MBC, 1979)
  • Frugal Family (MBC, 1979)
  • X 수색대 (MBC, 1978)
  • South Wind (MBC, 1978)
  • 봄처녀 오셨네 (MBC, 1977)
  • Third Class (MBC, 1977)
  • 귀로 (MBC, 1975)
  • Jade Flute (TBC, 1975)

Theater[edit]

  • I Really Really Like You (2010)

Music video[edit]

Variety show[edit]

Radio program[edit]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Noh, Jae-hyun (12 January 2013). "Adult diapers are closer than you think". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  2. ^ "2008.6.5 Event Calendar". Korea JoongAng Daily. 5 June 2008. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  3. ^ Choi, Min-woo (20 December 2008). "High notes and discord in the musical world". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  4. ^ "Actors Cha Seung Won, Jang Hyun Sung, & actress Lim Ye Jin along with management staff sign with YG Entertainment". Allkpop. January 19, 2014. 
  5. ^ Giammarco, Tom (10 October 2009). "A Good Windy Day (1980)". Seen in Jeonju. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  6. ^ Giammarco, Tom (19 September 2012). "Angry Young Men (1976)". Seen in Jeonju. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  7. ^ Giammarco, Tom (13 December 2012). "Ever So Good (1976)". Seen in Jeonju. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  8. ^ Kim, Hee-ju (7 July 2011). "T-ara holds Japan debut showcase". 10Asia. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  9. ^ Ko, Kyoung-seok (30 December 2009). "Yoo Jae-seok wins grand prize at MBC Entertainment Awards". 10Asia. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 

External links[edit]