Imprimi potest

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An imprimi potest, a nihil obstat and an imprimatur (by Richard Cushing) on a book published by Random House in 1953. The book in question is the English translation by Louis J. Gallagher, S.J. of De Christiana expeditione apud Sinas by Matteo Ricci, S.J. and Nicolas Trigault, S.J.

Imprimi potest (Latin for "it can be printed") is a declaration by a major superior of a Roman Catholic religious institute that writings on questions of religion or morals by a member of the institute may be printed.[1] Superiors make such declarations only after censors charged with examining the writings have granted the nihil obstat, a declaration of no objection. Final approval can then be given through the imprimatur ("let it be printed") of the author's bishop or of the bishop of the place of publication.[2]

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  1. ^ "Code of Canon Law, canon 832". Intratext.com. 2007-05-04. Retrieved 2013-01-22. 
  2. ^ "Code of Canon Law, canon 824". Intratext.com. 2007-05-04. Retrieved 2013-01-22. 

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