In Your Own Sweet Way

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"In Your Own Sweet Way"
In Your Own Sweet Way.jpg
Cover of the 2007 CD released on the Avid label, which included a previously unreleased 1958 recording of the song
Written by Iola Brubeck
Music by Dave Brubeck
Published July 16, 1956 (1956-07-16)
Language English
Recorded by Dave Brubeck
Performed by Dave Brubeck

"In Your Own Sweet Way" is a 1955 jazz standard, and one of the most famous compositions of Dave Brubeck. It was written around 1952,[1] but its copyright notice was dated 1955.[2] Brubeck's wife Iola, for whom the song was written,[3] later wrote a lyric for the song, which led to singers such as Carmen McRae covering it.[4] Although an earlier live recording is known, "In Your Own Sweet Way" was first released on Brubeck's 1956 studio album Brubeck Plays Brubeck.

Composition[edit]

"In Your Own Sweet Way" is written in the key of E flat major, and is in the form of a jazz ballad. Author of the 1996 biography It's About Time: The Dave Brubeck Story, Fred Hall, said that this jazz standard, like other standards, such as "Take Five," has been performed by "various Brubeck combinations" and many other artists.[5] All Music Guide to Jazz notes the "contrasting lines" of the piece,[6] while a reviewer in a 1994 edition of Jazz Times mentions the versatility of the piece, saying, "[This jazz standard] is in the performer category, i.e., a tune that is extremely adaptable to many styles. One disc jockey sent me a tape of 32 versions of it, and another collector told me he had over 50 versions by various artists." [7] In the booklet of his career retrospective release "Dave Brubeck - Time Signatures" he mentions: "For the first few years the quartet played almost all standards, until one Day Paul Desmond said to me: »We've got to hire somebody to write some material for us.« I said »Paul, are you kidding? I'll write two tunes in half an hour!« I wrote "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Waltz" that night. From then on we started doing my material a lot more."

Release[edit]

Although at least one earlier concert recording is known,[8] the song's first release, with three improvised choruses, was on Brubeck's 1956 solo album Brubeck Plays Brubeck.[2] The first quartet version appeared on the 1956 album Dave Brubeck and Jay & Kai at Newport, issued on the Columbia label. A new interpretation by the quartet appeared on the 1963 Columbia album Brandenburg Gate: Revisited.[9]

Legacy[edit]

Many jazz artists have covered the standard. In 1963, composer/arranger Clare Fischer recorded a solo piano version for his 1966 album Easy Livin'. Jazz fusion guitarist John Etheridge recorded a well-received version for his 1994 album Ash.[10] Art Farmer and Lee Konitz also covered it in 1994 with the Joe Carter Quartet and Trio.[7]

The song title gave its name to the 2010 documentary film about Brubeck, produced by Clint Eastwood, Dave Brubeck: In His Own Sweet Way.[11]

Jazz keyboardist Bob James was inspired by "In Your Own Sweet Way" to compose his 2013 song "You Better Not Go to College" in homage to Brubeck.[12]

Guitarist Wes Montgomery included the tune on his 1960 The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery album.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Randel, Don M (1996). The Harvard Biographical Dictionary of Music. Harvard University Press. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-674-37299-3. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "In Your Own Sweet Way". Jazzstandards.com. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  3. ^ Reich, Howard (June 20, 2011). "Dave Brubeck riffs with his sons on Father's Day". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved July 10, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Dave Brubeck: In Your Own Sweet Way". Allmusic. 2013. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 
  5. ^ Hall, Fred (1996). It's About Time: The Dave Brubeck Story. University of Arkansas Press. p. 68. ISBN 978-1-55728-405-1. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  6. ^ Bogdanov, Vladimir; Woodstra, Chris; Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2002). All Music Guide to Jazz: The Definitive Guide to Jazz Music. Backbeat Books. p. 361. ISBN 978-0-87930-717-2. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b JazzTimes. JazzTimes, Inc. December 1994. pp. 10–. ISSN 0272572X. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Dave Brubeck Catalog". Jazz Discography Project. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Dave Brubeck – Brandenburg Gate: Revisited" at allmusic.com/
  10. ^ Carr, Ian; Fairweather, Digby; Priestley, Brian (2004). Jazz: The Essential Companion to Artists and Albums. Rough Guides. p. 3. ISBN 978-1-84353-256-9. Retrieved December 22, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Dave Brubeck: In His Own Sweet Way (2010)". TCM. Retrieved July 7, 2013. 
  12. ^ Brady, Shaun (July 2, 2013). "Two reunited jazz stars play the Keswick". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved July 10, 2013. 

External links[edit]