In the Shadow of Z'ha'dum

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"In the Shadow of Z'ha'dum"
Babylon 5 episode
Episode no. Season 2
Episode 16
Directed by David J. Eagle
Written by J. Michael Straczynski
Production code 217
Original air date 10 May 1995
Guest actors

Jeff Conaway (Zack Allan)
Alex Hyde-White (Pierce Macabee)
Ed Wasser (Morden)

Episode chronology
← Previous
"And Now For a Word"
Next →
"Knives"
List of Babylon 5 episodes

"In the Shadow of Z'ha'dum" is an episode from the second season of the science fiction television series Babylon 5.

Synopsis[edit]

Sheridan holds Morden in custody and learns some of what happened to the expedition on which his wife was lost.

Arc significance[edit]

  • Vir reveals his desire to see Morden beheaded:
  • The history of the war between the Shadows and the other races, including the First Ones, is described for the first time.
  • This episode establishes Morden's relationship to Anna Sheridan.
  • This is the first episode where Franklin states he's taking stims, foreshadowing his future abuse.
  • Franklin reveals himself to be a Foundationist, a religion founded just after humans first went into space.
  • The first mention of the Nightwatch.
  • The Vorlons are revealed as being one of the First Ones.
  • Z'ha'dum is revealed to be the home of the Shadows.
  • This episode establishes Sheridan's relationship with Delenn.
  • The question that Delenn asked in Season 1 to which she was simply given the answer 'yes' was 'Have the Shadows returned to Z'ha'dum'?

Production details[edit]

  • This episode was originally intended to air after "Knives", rather than before, with Sheridan's hallucination of the Icarus in that episode serving as a reminder to the audience of his wife's fate before more details were revealed in this episode.[1]

Cultural references[edit]

  • Pierce Maccabee is the regional director of the Ministry of Peace, AKA "Minipax"—a reference to the organization of the same name and nickname—as in Orwell's 1984.
  • The name Z'ha'dum can be seen as a homage to Tolkien's Khazad-dûm (Moria) in Middle Earth. Just as Khazad-dûm has been abandoned for many years, and is now inhabited by an ancient evil, so too Z'ha'dum, once the home of a mighty civilization, is now the home of an ancient and deadly evil.

References[edit]

External links[edit]