Incarceration of women

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This article discusses the incarceration of women in correctional facilities.

Characteristics[edit]

Early facilities were considered nub with little regard for health and safety. Men and women were housed in a large room where the strong preyed on the weak.[1] As of 2007, in most of the Western world, the guards on female prisons are exclusively female.[2] As of that year there are males who work as guards in women's prisons in the United States.[3] However, some states have laws requiring female officers as well as a female superintendent. While most states have only one or two institutions for women, some facilities are considered "unisex" and house both male and female inmates in separate areas.[4]

History[edit]

United States[edit]

In the United States, authorities began housing women in correctional facilities separate from men in the 1870s.[5] The first American female correctional facility with dedicated buildings and staff was the Mount Pleasant Female Prison in Ossining, New York; the facility had some operational dependence on nearby Sing Sing, a men's prison.[6] In the 1930s, 34 women's prisons were built, by 1990 there were 71 women's prisons in the country, but only five years later there were 150 (Chesney-Lind, 1998:66).[7]

Great Britain[edit]

In Great Britain, a new policy has passed, and women no longer have to be restrained while giving birth when serving their sentence. The British services for human rights quotes, "no one should be subjected to degrading punishment, and the United Nations standard minimum rules for the treatment of prisoners refuse to go to child care events, or funerals because of the humiliation the restraints show. Women in Britain fought for their right to not be restrained while giving birth to their child. However, they must be restrained while being escorted to and from the hospital. More women than men will escape the prison system in Britain. Of those women who escape almost half of them escape while receiving medical attention at a hospital.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pollock, Joycelyn M. (2002). Women, Prison, & Crime. CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning. p. 23. 
  2. ^ Talvi, Silja (2007). Women Behind Bars: The Crisis of Women in the U.S. Prison System. Emeryville: Seal Press. pp. 56. 
  3. ^ Talvi, Silja (2007). Women Behind Bars: The Crisis of Women in the U.S. Prison System. Emeryville: Seal Press. pp. 57. 
  4. ^ Pollock, Joycelyn M. (2002). Women, Prison, & Crime. CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning. p. 9. 
  5. ^ Banks, Cyndi. Women in Prison: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO, 2003. p.1. Retrieved from Google Books on March 10, 2011. ISBN 1-57607-929-5, ISBN 978-1-57607-929-4.
  6. ^ Banks, Cyndi. Women in Prison: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO, 2003. p.5. Retrieved from Google Books on March 10, 2011. ISBN 1-57607-929-5, ISBN 978-1-57607-929-4.
  7. ^ Pollock, Joycelyn M. (2002). Women, Prison, & Crime. CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning. pp. 68–69. 

Antonova, N. (2013, Nov 4th). Reforming Russian Women's Prisons.

Further reading[edit]