Incisive foramen

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Incisive foramen
Gray160.png
The bony palate and alveolar arch.
Details
Latin fossa incisiva
Identifiers
Gray's p.162
Dorlands
/Elsevier
f_12/12373096
TA A02.1.00.060
FMA 57737
Anatomical terms of bone

In the human oral cavity, the incisive foramen, also called anterior palatine foramen, is a funnel-shaped opening in the bone of the oral hard palate immediately behind the incisor teeth where blood vessels and nerves pass. The incisive foramen is continuous with the incisive canal, this foramen or group of foramina are located posterior to the central incisor teeth in the incisive fossa of the maxilla.

The incisive foramen receives the nasopalatine nerves from the floor of the nasal cavity along with the sphenopalatine artery supplying the oral mucosa covering the hard palate of the mouth

Additional images[edit]

References[edit]

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

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