Indian Packing Company

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The Indian Packing Company was a company that was involved in the canned meat industry and was organized in Delaware on July 22, 1919.[1] Its canned meat sold as "Council Meats." When the company was absorbed by the Illinois-based Acme Packing Company in 1921, it had facilities in Green Bay, Wisconsin; Providence, Rhode Island; Greenwood, Indiana; and Dupont, Indiana[2][3] At the time of the sale it was controlled by New England Supply Company of Providence, Rhode Island with F.P Comstock as its principal owner.[1]

Among its slogans were "A meat market on your pantry shelf" and "From the Wisconsin country to you."[4]

Today, the company is remembered as the namesake of the Green Bay Packers. The world-class football team took its name after Curly Lambeau, a shipping clerk for the company, successfully asked the company's owner, Frank Peck, for money for jerseys and use of the company's athletic field in 1919.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://books.google.com/books?id=xhHnAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA41&dq="Indian+Packing"&hl=en&ei=GOM1Td2MA8zpgAfj8ZWxCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22Indian%20Packing%
  2. ^ "Acme Packers Absorb Another Firm" (PDF). The New York Times. 1921-01-11. Retrieved 2007-11-11. 
  3. ^ Names, Larry D (1987). "The Myth". In Scott, Greg. The History of the Green Bay Packers: The Lambeau Years 1. Angel Press of WI. p. 30. ISBN 0-939995-00-X. 
  4. ^ "Official gazette of the United States Patent Office - United States. Patent Office - Google Books". Books.google.com. 2008-10-28. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 
  5. ^ "Birth of a Team and a Legend". The Green Bay Packers website. Retrieved 2007-11-11.