Indian soap opera

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Indian soap operas or Indian serials are soap operas written, produced, filmed in India, with characters played by Indians with episodes broadcast on Indian television.[1]

India's first soap opera was Hum Log, which concluded with 154 episodes, was the longest running serial in the history of Indian television at the time it ended.

The most common languages in which Indian serials are made in are Hindi, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, and Malayalam, though many contain a mix of the predominant language and English.

History[edit]

India's first soap opera was Hum Log, which first aired in 1984[2] and concluded with 154 episodes, was the longest running serial in the history of Indian television at the time it ended. It had an audience of 60 million.[3] Every episode of was about 25 minutes long, and the last episode was about 55 minutes. At the end of every episode, veteran Hindi film actor Ashok Kumar would discuss the ongoing story and situations with the audience using Hindi couplets and limericks. In later episodes, he would introduce the actors who played characters in the serial and end his monologue with the Indian language versions of the words "Hum Log."

In early 2000, Sony TV bought the tapes from Doordarshan and re-telecasted the 154 episode story in 52 episodes.

It was retelecasted on Doordarshan in 2012 as Hum- Ek Chote Gaon Ki Badi Kahani. The cast included Sadiya Siddiqui, Mona Wasu, Vineet Kumar, Suhasini Mulay, Anjan Srivastva, Himani Shivpuri and Harsh Chhaya.

Biographies of famous people started being produced in the form of soap operas. Meera was a biography of Meera, Veer Shivaji portrayed Chhatrapati Shivaji Shahji Raje Bhosle, Jhansi Ki Rani presented Rani Lakshmi Bai of Jhansi, Chanakya covered Chanakya and Chittod Ki Rani Padmini Ka Johur portrayed Rani Padmini.

Biographies of famous tamil devotional Saint-Poets people started being produced in the form of soap operas. nayanmargal was a biography of Nayanars. Tamil historical drama also started being produced and aired. Romapuri Pandian.

Crime shows also started being produced and aired. Adaalat was an Indian television courtroom drama series which revolves around 'Advocate K.D Pathak', a defense lawyer with an impeccable track record of winning cases and setting helpless innocent victims free, but not at the cost of upholding the truth and C.I.D., follows a team of detectives belonging to the Crime Investigation Department in Mumbai. The protagonist of the show is Shivaji Satam. C.I.D. is the longest-running TV series in India.[4]

Social impact[edit]

Soaps have an impact on Indian society, with regard to national integration, identity, globalisation,[5] women and ethics. The first Indian soap opera, Hum Log, began as a family planning program, and although it quickly turned its focus to entertainment, it continued to embed pro-development messages which provided a model of utilizing the television serial as an "edutainment" method that was followed by countries around the world.[6]

A 2007 study of cable coming to rural India showed that it led to "significant decreases in the reported acceptability of domestic violence towards women and son preference, as well as increases in women's autonomy and decreases in fertility." It also "found suggestive evidence that exposure to cable increases school enrollment for younger children, perhaps through increased participation of women in household decision-making."[7][8]

Longest running[edit]

Hindi Serial[edit]

A number of serials have run more than a 1500 episodes. There are three shows:

Year Show No. of Episodes Channel Status
3 July 2000 – 6 November 2008 Kyunki Saas Bhi Kabhi Bahu Thi 1833 STAR Plus Off-Air
16 October 2000 – 9 October 2008 Kahaani Ghar Ghar Kii 1661 STAR Plus Off-Air
21 July 2008 – Present Balika Vadhu 1625 (03.07.2014 Colors TV On-Air

A number of serials have run less than a 1500 episodes. There are five shows:

Year Show No. of Episodes Channel Status
12 January 2009 – Present Yeh Rishta Kya Kehlata Hai 1475 (03.07.2014) STAR Plus On-Air
15 July 2002 – 13 March 2009 Kumkum - Ek Pyar Sa Bandhan 1449 STAR Plus Off-Air
28 July 2008 – Present Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah 1446 (03.07.2014) SAB TV On-Air
29 October 2001 – 28 February 2008 Kasautii Zindagii Kay 1423 STAR Plus Off-Air
1 December 2008 – Present Uttaran 1414 (03.07.2014) Colors TV On-Air

Tamil Serial[edit]

A number of serials have run more than a 1500 episodes. There are two shows:

Year Show No. of Episodes Channel Status
24 November 2003 – 04 December 2009 Kolangal 1553 Sun TV Off-Air
21 August 2006 – 31 August 2012 2006-08-21 Kasturi 1532 Sun TV Off-Air

A number of serials have run less than a 1500 episodes. There are nine shows:

Year Show No. of Episodes Channel Status
5 November 2007 – 22 March 2013 2007-11-5 Thirumathi Selvam 1360 Sun TV Off-Air
24 November 2003 – 27 February 2009 Anandham 1297 Sun TV Off-Air
3 December 2007 – 14 December 2009 Athipookal 1272 Sun TV Off-Air
7 December 2009 – Present Thendral 1186 (12.07.2014) Sun TV On-Air
19 January 2010 – Present Ilavarasi 1172 (12.07.2014) Sun TV On-Air
8 October 2007 – 14 October 2011 Magal 1015 Sun TV Off-Air
19 April 2010 – Present Nadhaswaram 1109 (12.07.2014) Sun TV On-Air
3 September 2007 – 27 January 2012 Vasantham 1109 Sun TV Off-Air
26 April 2010 – Present Mundhanai Mudichu 1107 (12.07.2014) Sun TV On-Air

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pak-Hind Ka Swag, Book 5 "Culture, Technology and fun", chapter 16 "soap opera, Serials and films"
  2. ^ Kohli, Vanita (14 June 2006). The Indian Media Business. SAGE Publications. pp. 1–. ISBN 9780761934691. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  3. ^ Gokulsing, K. Moti (2004). Soft-soaping India: The World of Indian Televised Soap Operas. Trentham Books. pp. 32–. ISBN 9781858563213. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "What makes this TV show such a hit with Indians?". Movies.rediff.com. Retrieved 6 August 2010. 
  5. ^ Gokulsing, K. (2004). Soft-Soaping India: The World of Indian Televised Soap Operas. Trentham Books, UK. ISBN 1-85856-321-6. p. 105.
  6. ^ Aggarwal, Vir Bala; Gupta, V. S. (1 January 2001). Handbook of Journalism and Mass Communication. Concept Publishing Company. pp. 208–. ISBN 9788170228806. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  7. ^ Jensen, Robert & Oster, Emily Oster (August 2007). "The Power of TV: Cable Television and Women's Status in India." Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press. Vol. 124(3) pp. 1057-1094.
  8. ^ Munshi, Shoma (2010). Prime Time Soap Operas on Indian Television. Routledge, New Delhi. ISBN 978-0-415-55377-3. pp. 200.

External links[edit]