Indiana Jones' Greatest Adventures

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Indiana Jones’ Greatest Adventures
Boxart for Indiana Jones' Greatest Adventures
Cover art
Developer(s) Factor 5
LucasArts
Publisher(s) JVC, LucasArts
Engine Super Star Wars
Platform(s) Super NES, Virtual Console
Release date(s) SNES
  • NA October 11, 1994
  • EU July 27, 1995
  • JP July 28, 1995
Virtual Console
  • NA November 16, 2009[1]
  • PAL April 23, 2010
Genre(s) Platform
Mode(s) Single-player
Distribution 16-megabit Cartridge

Indiana Jones’ Greatest Adventures is a 1994 platform video game released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It is a video game adaptation of the Indiana Jones films Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989). The game was developed by Factor 5 and published by JVC Musical Industries, Inc. The story is told through cut-scenes and text and is mostly faithful to the movies. Its release also coincided with the release of Super Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, also released by JVC and LucasArts and in the same platform style as the Super Star Wars trilogy.

A Sega Mega Drive/Genesis port of the game was apparently completed and ready to be released between summer and autumn of 1995, and was previewed in Electronic Gaming Monthly (#73, August 1995)[2][3] and even reviewed in GamePro (#73, August 1995, rated 3.5 out of 5.0)[4] and in Germany's GAMERS (November 1995 issue, rated 2 (B Grade).[5][6] But like many third-party titles near the end of the Genesis' life however, the game was shelved and was never released, and no known copies have been released to the public.

The game was re-released for the Wii's Virtual Console service on November 16, 2009[1] and in the PAL region on April 23, 2010 for 800 Nintendo Points.

Gameplay[edit]

The game is primarily action based, and the player controls Indy through levels based on events of the movies. Indy's main method of attack is his bull-whip, but he can also damage enemies by punching or rolling into them. Occasionally a gun can be found that has unlimited ammo, and grenades are available in limited numbers. Besides attacking, the whip can also be used as a method of swinging across pits. Once in a while, the game breaks the mold from the typical action and plunges the player into various other types of gameplay, such as flying a plane, riding a mine cart, and going down a mountain on a raft.

Indy fights Walter Donovan's skeleton

Indiana Jones’ Greatest Adventures is a game with an engine similar to the Super Star Wars series and is broken into 28 areas, many of them in side-scrolling view, and others in driving stages.

All three of the movies are featured in the game, but Raiders of the Lost Ark is the only one playable upon starting the game. In order to play Temple of Doom and Last Crusade, the player must progress through the game or use a password. The password system bypassed conventional lettering, opting instead to use the Greek alphabet. Like the Super Star Wars trilogy, Indiana Jones' Greatest Adventures is still regarded as an extremely challenging game to complete. Many levels are often quite long and include several enemies of all type, in some levels in which a villain from the movie has to be fought. While the stages from Raiders and Last Crusade are of moderate difficulty, some levels from Temple of Doom (such as the Pankot caves) bring with them a very high level of difficulty and a large amount of traps and enemies.

According to reviews, the most difficult stages in the game are said to be the driving stages: The snowraft and mine car chase from Temple of Doom, and the biplane dogfight from Last Crusade, where the player has to avoid certain traps and enemies. If the player is defeated in these stages, he has to restart the entire level. Also if the player loses all of his lives in some area (for example Cairo in Raiders), he is forced to start all the stages of the area in which he was defeated.

Reception[edit]

The game was fairly well received by critics and fans alike. On release, Famicom Tsūshin scored the Super Famicom version of the game a 25 out of 40.[7] AllGame praises the game's simple, but effective gameplay and controls and faithfulness to the source material. The game's graphics and music are also generally regarded positively (with music taken from John Williams's compositions of the films). In the negative side, a common complaint about the music was the limited use of music from all of the films (many of them taken from Raiders, three themes from Temple of Doom, and one taken from Last Crusade). Also many scenes from the films are not present in the game (the truck chase from Raiders, the boat and motorcycle chase along with the opening from Last Crusade). Also the "Choose Wisely" feature from previous games based on Last Crusade was omitted.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Try Before You Buy: Nintendo Offers 5 Game Demos to Guide Holiday Shoppers". Nintendo of America. November 16, 2009. Archived from the original on November 16, 2009. Retrieved November 16, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Electronic Gaming Monthly (USA) preview Part 1, issue 73, August 1995". Retrieved July 6, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Electronic Gaming Monthly (USA) preview Part 2, issue 73, August 1995". Retrieved July 6, 2009. 
  4. ^ "GamePro (USA) review, issue 73, August 1995". Retrieved July 6, 2009. 
  5. ^ "GAMERS (Germany) review Part 1, November 1995 issue". Retrieved July 6, 2009. 
  6. ^ "GAMERS (Germany) review Part 2, November 1995 issue". Retrieved July 6, 2009. 
  7. ^ NEW GAMES CROSS REVIEW: インディ・ジョーンズ. Weekly Famicom Tsūshin. No.346. Pg.30. 4 August 1995.

External links[edit]