Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment Initiative

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Indigenous Peoples' Biocultural Climate Change Assessment Initiative
Abbreviation IPCCA
Legal status Partnership
Purpose To:
1. empower indigenous peoples to develop and use indigenous frameworks to assess the impact of climate change on their communities and ecosystems
2. to develop and implement strategies for building indigenous resilience and adaptive strategies to mitigate impacts
3. to enhance biocultural diversity for food sovereignty and self determined development or “Buen Vivir.”
Headquarters Association for Nature and Sustainable Development (ANDES)
Calle Ruinas 451, Cusco
Location
Region served Global
Membership i. Association Andes,
ii. Indigenous Peoples Consortium on climate Change,
iii. Call of the Earth Group,
iv. Traditional Knowledge Initiative of the Institute of Advanced Studies (United Nations University)
v. International Institute for Environment and development
vi. OXFAM-NOVIB
vii. Christensfund
vii. Land is Life
Official language Spanish, English
Website Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment Initiative

The Indigenous Peoples' Biocultural Climate Change Assessment Initiative (IPCCA) is an international indigenous research initiative arising out of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, where it was noted:[1]

" .. cultures that support TK [Traditional Knowledge] around the world are often living in marginal ecosystems, such as the Arctic, mountains, deserts and small islands ..[which are] .. often the sources of key ecosystem services .... most vulnerable to climate change"

[2]

At the Seventh Session of the Permanent Forum, held from 21 April to 2 May 2008, it was recommended that:[1]

" ..the United Nations University – Institute of Advanced Studies, university research centres and relevant United Nations agencies conduct further studies on the impacts of climate change and climate change responses on indigenous peoples who are living in highly fragile ecosystems".

From this recommendation, a formal Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment Initiative was formed between the United Nations University's Institute of Advanced Studies and a number of non-United Nations partners; with an indigenous led steering committee coordinated by a secretariat housed within the Association for Nature and Sustainable Development (ANDES), Peru; and an objective:[3][4][5]

"To empower indigenous peoples to develop and use indigenous frameworks to assess the impact of climate change on their communities and ecosystems and to develop and implement strategies for building indigenous resilience and adaptive strategies to mitigate impacts while enhancing biocultural diversity for food sovereignty and self determined development or “Buen Vivir.”"

Global Summit[edit]

On the 20–24 April 2009, members of the Indigenous Peoples' Biocultural Climate Change Assessment Initiative assisted arrange a Global Summit of Indigenous Peoples held in Anchorage (Alaska) to discuss Climate Change[6]

"The purpose of the Summit was to enable indigenous peoples from all regions of the globe to exchange their knowledge and experience in adapting to the impacts of climate change, and to develop key messages and recommendations to be articulated to the world at the Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark in December 2009"

The United Nations University - Institute of Advanced Studies provided significant and substantive assistance preparing background papers for this Summit, with the logistics of this Summit, plus with rapporteuring for this Summit, one of the outcomes of which was an 'Anchorage Declaration' of Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change[7]

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