Indoor ski slope

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Ski slope in Ski Dubai

Indoor ski slopes provide a climate controlled environment in which snow is manufactured using a snow cannon. This enables skiing and snowboarding to take place year-round. The first indoor ski slope called "Schneepalast" (German for snow palace) was opened on November 26, 1927 in Vienna in an abandoned railway station, the Nordwestbahnhof. The snow was made of soda. The Schneepalast was closed in 1943.[1] The world's first commercial indoor ski slope operated from 1987 to 2005 at Mount Thebarton, in Adelaide, South Australia.[2]

Notable mentions[edit]

The world's largest indoor ski area is SnowWorld, Landgraaf, Netherlands[citation needed] (opened 2001) with a total of 35,000 m² of snow. In 2003, the first indoor snowboard FIS WorldCup contest was held in SnowWorld Landgraaf.

The world's longest indoor slope with 640 m is in the AlpinCenter in Bottrop/Germany and the world's first indoor black diamond (difficulty rating) with a 31 percent grade is in the SnowFunPark in Wittenburg/Germany.

The biggest indoor slope in the UK is Chill Factore, 4 miles outside Manchester,[3] featuring a 180m long real snow main slope.

Indoor ski slope locations[edit]

SnowWorld in Landgraaf, the Netherlands.

An incomplete list of operating indoor ski slopes in the world:

Country City/Region Facility Length
Australia Melbourne SkiCity Endless[*]
Belgium
Comines Ice mountain 210 m
Peer Snow Valley 235 m
Brazil Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul Snowland
China Shanghai Shanghai Yinqixing Indoor Skiing Site 380 m
Shenzhen Window of the World Indoor Skiing Site
Beijing QbSki
France Amnéville (Lorraine) Snowhall 620 m
Germany Bispingen SnowDome Bispingen 300 m
Bottrop AlpinCenter Bottrop 640 m
Neuss Jever Skihalle 300 m
Oberhof Skisporthalle Oberhof 1754 m
Senftenberg Snowtropolis 130 m
Wittenburg AlpinCenter Hamburg-Wittenburg 330 m
India Bangalore Snow City
Hyderabad Snow World
Japan Fukuoka Big Air Fukuoka
Hashima Snova Hashima
Kawasaki Snova Mizonokuchi
Ryūgasaki Kamui Ryūgasaki Snowboard Park
Sayama Sayama Ski Area 320 m
Tōon Across Shigenobu
Yokohama Snova Shinyokohama
Lithuania Druskininkai Snow Arena 460 m
Netherlands The Hague Snowdome (Uithof) 211 m
Landgraaf Snowworld 520 m
Rucphen Ski Dome 160 m
Spaarnwoude Snowplanet 230 m
Zoetermeer Snowworld 210 m
Terneuzen Ski Dome 220 m
Westerhoven Montana Snowcenter 140 m
New Zealand Auckland Snowplanet 200 m
Poland Rzyki, near Wadowice Czarny groń[4] Endless[*]
Russia Krasnogorsk, near Moscow Snej 400 m
Serbia Belgrade Skitrack Ada Endless[*]
South Korea Bucheon TigerWorld - TigerWorld 170 m
Spain Madrid Madrid Xanadu - SnowZone 250 m
Turkey Istanbul Snow Park - Deepo shopping center 220 m
United Arab Emirates Dubai Ski Dubai 400 m
United Kingdom Braehead, Glasgow Snow Factor 200 m
Castleford, Yorkshire SNO!zone 170 m
Manchester Chill Factore 180 m
Milton Keynes SNO!zone 170 m
Tamworth Snowdome 170 m
Hemel Hempstead The Snow Centre 160 m
[*]Ski simulator

Under construction[edit]

Proposed[edit]

Closed[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Von Bernhard Ichner (2014-01-26). "Die Skistadt Wien - ein historischer Rückblick". Kurier.At. Retrieved 2014-02-21. 
  2. ^ Australian Ski Lift Directory http://wikiski.com/wiki/index.php/Australian_ski_tow_directory#Other_passenger_ropeways_.28non_snow.29
  3. ^ "Chill Factore". Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ Von Bernhard Ichner (2014-01-26). "Die Skistadt Wien - ein historischer Rückblick". Kurier.At. Retrieved 2014-02-21.