Indraéro Aéro 101

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Aéro 101 and Aéro 110
Aero 101 F-PKVT Mitry-Mory 040671 edited-3.jpg
Aero 101 at Mitry-Mory airfield, near Paris, in June 1971
Role Civil trainer
National origin France
Manufacturer Indraéro
Designer Jean Chapeau and J. Blanchet
First flight 27 July 1951
Status three examples active in 2009
Primary user SALS
Number built ca 13

The Indraéro Aéro 101 was a light training biplane developed in France in the 1950s.

Design and service[edit]

It was a conventional design with single-bay staggered wings braced with an I-strut, and fixed tailskid undercarriage with divided main units. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem, open cockpits. A small batch of aircraft were ordered by SALS for aeroclub use.

The prototype, known as the Aéro 110, differing from the later production Aero 101s by having a welded steel tube fuselage and a 34 kW (45 hp) Salmson 9ADb radial engine, first flew on 1 May 1950

Operational history[edit]

Three examples of the type were current on the French Civil Aircraft Register in 2009, including an Aero 101C and two Aero 101s.[1]

Variants[edit]

Aéro 110
Prototype of the Aero 101 with welded steel tube fuselage and Salmson 9ADb radial engine first flown on 1 May 1950, 1 built.
Aéro 101
Ten production aircraft built with wooden structure and powered by Minié 4DC-32 engines, first flown on 27 July 1951.
Aéro 101C
At least one aircraft fitted with a 48 kW (65 hp) Continental A65.

Specifications (Aéro 101)[edit]

Data from [2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 5.6 m (18 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 7.6 m (24 ft 11 in)
  • Height: 2.2 m (7 ft 3 in)
  • Wing area: 14.0 m2 (151 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 312 kg (688 lb)
  • Gross weight: 505 kg (1,113 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Minié 4DC-32 4-cyl. air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine, 56 kW (75 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 178 km/h (111 mph; 96 kn)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Partington, 2009, pp 183-224
  2. ^ Parmentier, Bruno. "Indraéro Aéro 101". Retrieved 6 December 2013. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 534. 
  • Simpson, R. W. (1995). Airlife's General Aviation. Shrewsbury: Airlife Publishing. pp. 424–25. 
  • Partington, Dave (2009). European Registers Handbook 2009. Tonbridge, Kent: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd. ISBN 978-0-85130-417-5. 

External links[edit]