Occupational injury

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An occupational injury is bodily damage resulting from working. The most usual organs involved are the spine, hands, the head, lungs, eyes, skeleton, and skin.

Common causes of industrial injury are poor ergonomics, manual handling of heavy loads, misuse or failure of equipment, exposure to general hazards, inadequate safety training and clothing, jewellery or long hair that becomes tangled in machinery.

General hazards in a work environment include electricity, explosive materials, fire, flammable gases, heat, height, high pressure gases and liquids, hot gases and liquids, powerful or sharp moving machinery, oxygen-free gases or spaces, poisonous gases, radiation, toxic materials, work on, near or under water, work on, near or under weak or heavy structures.

There are many methods of preventing or reducing industrial injuries, including anticipation of problems by risk assessment, safety training, control banding, personal protective equipment safety guards, mechanisms on machinery, and safety barriers. In addition, past problems can be analyzed to find their root causes by using a technique called root cause analysis.

Statistics[edit]

It has been estimated that worldwide there are more than 350,000 workplace fatalities and more than 270 million workplace injuries annually.[1]

United States[edit]

In the United States in 2012, 4,383 workers died from job injuries, 92% of which were men. [2]

In the United States in 2007, 5,488 workers died from job injuries, 92% of which were men,[3] and 49,000 died from work-related injuries.[4] NIOSH estimates that 4 million workers in the U.S. in 2007 suffered from non-fatal work related injuries or illnesses.[5]

According to data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Bureau of Labor Statistics, an average of 15 workers die from traumatic injuries each day in the United States, and an additional 200 workers are hospitalized.[6]

In the U.S. the Bureau of Labor Statistics makes available extensive statistics on workplace accidents and injuries.[7] For example:

BLS US fatalities by industry 2010.png BLS US fatal injuries by occupation 2010.png

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barling, J., & Frone, M. R. (2004). Occupational injuries: Setting the stage. In J. Barling & M. R. Frone (Eds.), The psychology of workplace safety. Washington, DC: APA.
  2. ^ US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Charts, 1992-2012."
  3. ^ US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. "National census of fatal occupational injuries in 2007." Washington, DC: US Department of Labor; 2008. Retrieved at: About NIOSH. Available at [1].
  4. ^ Steenland K, Burnett C, Lalich N, Ward E, Hurrell J. Dying for work: the magnitude of U.S. mortality from selected causes of death associated with occupation. Am J Ind Med 2003;43:461--82. Retrieved at:About NIOSH.
  5. ^ US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Workplace injuries and illnesses in 2007. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor; 2008. Retrieved at: About NIOSH. Available at [2].
  6. ^ "Traumatic Occupational Injuries". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Retrieved 29 May 2009. 
  7. ^ http://www.bls.gov/iif

External links[edit]