List of insects of the Indiana Dunes

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Many insects are considered pests by humans. Those insects regarded as pests include those that are parasitic (mosquitoes, lice, bed bugs), transmit diseases (mosquitoes, flies), damage structures (termites), or destroy agricultural goods (locusts, weevils). Many more insects are beneficial to the environment and to humans. Some insects, like wasps, bees, butterflies, and ants, pollinate flowering plants.

Orthoptera[edit]

Grasshoppers, Roaches, and their kin. Medium to larger insects that live on land. They have a leathery forewing and hind wings that fold like fans or no hind wing. They have mouth parts to chew their food.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns Trifolium – Clover[2] Solomon’s seal sedges Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove) Solidago spp. – Golden Rod
Blattidae Cockroaches
X

Dermaptera[edit]

Earwigs. Medium sized insect with pincer-like tails. They usually have two pairs of short wings and segmented antenna.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Quercus Velutin – Black Oak Prunus virginiana – chokecherry Ferns Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges

Isoptera[edit]

Termites. These are ant like creatures with small, soft-bodies. They live in colonies and have castes assigned to specific chores. Some individuals have four wings.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Quercus Velutin – Black Oak Prunus virginiana – chokecherry Salix sp. – willows Populus deltoids – cottonwood

Anoplura[edit]

Lice. Tiny insects, without wings. They have piercing and sucking parts to their mouths. Their flat body and legs with claws allow them to cling to warm-blooded animals.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges Solidago spp. – Golden Rod

Auchenorrhyncha[edit]

Leafhoppers, planthoppers, and Cicadas. These are small to medium insects with two pairs of wings.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails[2] Prunus virginiana – chokecherry[2] Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover[2] Solomon’s seal[2] sedges[2] Salix sp. – willows[2] Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove)[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Acanaloniidae planthoppers
X
X
X
X
X
Cicadellidae Graphocephala sp. Leafhoppers
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Flatidae Flatid planthoppers
X
X

Heteroptera[edit]

True Bugs. With a ranges of sizes from small to large, each has two pairs of wings. The forewing is partly thickened.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails![2] Quercus Velutin – Black Oak[2] Ferns Trifolium – Clover[2] Salix sp. – willows[2] Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove)[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Berytidae Stilt bugs
X
X
Lygaeidae Seed bugs
X
X
X
Nabidae Damsel bugs
X
X
Pentatomidae Stink bugs
X
X
X
Reduviidae Assassin bugs
X
Scutelleridae Shield-Backed bugs
X

Odonata[edit]

Dragonfiles and Damselfiles. Large to medium insects with two pairs of equal-sized wings. Their bodies are long and slender, like their wings. They have a short antenna. Immature stages are acqutic.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges Solidago spp. – Golden Rod
Zygoptera Damselflies
X
Anisoptera Dragonflies
X

Ephemerida & Plecoptera[edit]

Mayflies and Stone flies. Both groups have two pairs of transparent wings with veins. In mayflies, the hind wing is the smaller, while in the stoneflies, the forewing is smaller. Mayflies have long tails. Both groups are aquatic when immature.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove) Solidago spp. – Golden Rod

Neuroptera[edit]

Nerve-Winged Insects. These are large insects with two pairs of wings of equal size. The wings hare netted by veins. They have chewing mouth parts and long antennae.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Quercus Velutin – Black Oak[2] Prunus virginiana – chokecherry[2] Ferns[2] Solomon’s seal[2] sedges[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Hemerobiidae Brown lacewings
X
X
X
Chrysopidae Green lacewings
X
X
X
X
X

Mecoptera[edit]

Scorpionflies. Medium insects with two pairs of potted, slender wings. They have long legs and long antennae. They have a beak-like mouth with chewing parts. Larvae lives in the soil.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges Salix sp. – willows Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove) Solidago spp. – Golden Rod

Trichoptera[edit]

Caddisflies. Small to medium insects. Larvae are fresh water habitats. Adults have two pairs of wings with long, silky hairs. They have long antenna.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns Trifolium – Clover Solomon’s seal sedges Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove) Solidago spp. – Golden Rod

Lepidoptera[edit]

Moths and Butterflies. They can be small to large in size. They have two pairs of scaly wings. Their antennae canb e knob-like or feathery. Mouth-parts are sometimes reduced.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover
Tineidae Clothes moths
X

Diptera[edit]

Flies and their kin. The insects can be tiny to small with two wings. They have sucking parts for their mouths. The antennae are small and their face is dominated by their eyes. A second pair of wings is generally reduced.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Typha latifolia – cattails[2] Quercus Velutin – Black Oak Prunus virginiana – chokecherry[2] Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover[2] Solomon’s seal[2] sedges[2] Salix sp. – willows[2] Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove)[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Agromyzidae Leaf miner flies
X
Anthomyiidae Anthomyzid flies
X
Asilidae Robber flies
X
Bibionidae March flies
X
Bombyliidae Bee flies
X
Chironomidae Midges
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Chloropidae Chloropids
X
X
Lonchaeidae Lonchaeids
X
Otitidae Picture-Winged flies
X
Pipunculidae Big-Headed flies
X
Sciomyzidae Marsh flies
X
X

Coleoptera[edit]

Beetles. This group has modified wings. The Forewings have hardened as covers and the hindwings a thin and fold. They variety from tiny to large in size. Their antennae are usually short and they have chewing mouth-parts. Some are aquatic, others are land based.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Prunus virginiana – chokecherry[2] Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover[2] sedges[2] Salix sp. – willows[2] Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove)[2] Populus deltoids – cottonwood[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Chrysomelidae Leaf beetles
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Coccinellidae Ladybird beetles
X
Cucujidae Flat Bark beetles
X
Curculionidae Apioninae Snout beetles
X
X
X
X
Helodidae Marsh beetles
X
X
Lampyridae Lightning bugs -Firefly
X
Staphylinidae Rove beetles
X
Tenebrionidae Darkling beetles
X

Hymenoptera[edit]

Bees, Wasps, and Ants. There is a wide range of sizes from tiny too large. They are a social animal living in colonies. Individuals have two pairs of thin, transparent wings. The hindwing is smaller. Mouth parts are either designed for chewing or for sucking. Some have ‘stingers’, the only insects to have such.[1]

SPECIES COMMON NAME Quercus Velutin – Black Oak[2] Prunus virginiana – chokecherry[2] Ferns[2] Trifolium – Clover[2] Solomon’s seal[2] sedges[2] Salix sp. – willows[2] Agalinisurpurea sp. – Purple Geardia (Purple False Foxglove)[2] Solidago spp. – Golden Rod[2]
Braconidae Braconids
X
X
X
X
X
Eulophidae Eulophids
X
X
Formicidae (48 species) Ants
X
X
X
X
Ichneumonidae Ichneumons
X
X
Scoliidae Scoliid wasps
Sphecidae Treadwaisted wasps
X
Torymidae Torymids
Vespidae Yellowjackets
X

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o A Golden Guide; Insects; Herger S. Zim and Clarence Cottam, ill. By James Gordon Irving: Golden Press, New York; a Western Publishing Company, Racine, Wisconsin; 1987
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax Ecology of Miller Woods, National Park Service, Midwest Region, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Research Program, Report 90-01;Table 4-8. List of taxa collected using standard terrestrial insect sweeps

See also[edit]