Inspector (role variant)

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The Inspector Guardian is one of the 16 role variants of the Keirsey Temperament Sorter,[1] a self-assessed personality questionnaire designed to help people better understand themselves. David Keirsey originally described the Inspector role variant; however, a brief summary of the personality types described by Isabel Myers contributed to its development. Inspectors correlate with the ISTJ Myers-Briggs type.[2]

Overview[edit]

Inspectors are careful and thorough in examining people and institutions. Comprising about 6 to 10 percent of the population, Inspectors are decisive in practical affairs. These guardians of institutions are perhaps best described as dependable: Inspectors are people of their word, intent on preserving social and family values. At home and at work, Inspectors reliably examine the people and products that fall under their tutelage—unobtrusively ensuring uniform quality and demanding that certain standards of conduct are maintained.

In both their professional and personal lives, individuals of this type are rather quiet and serious. Inspectors are extraordinarily persevering and dependable. The thought of dishonoring a contract would appall a person of this type. When they give their word, they give their honor. Inspectors can be counted on to conserve the resources of the institution they serve and bring to their work a practical point of view. They perform their duties without flourish or fanfare; therefore, the dedication they bring to their work can go unnoticed and unappreciated.

While not directly seeking leadership positions, Inspectors are often placed in such roles. They build a reputation for reliable, stable, and consistent performance that inspires others to select them to lead. Inspectors use their past experience and their factual knowledge in their decision making.

For Inspectors, love means commitment, steadiness, and consistency. Inspectors expect themselves and their mates to be responsible, practical, and dependable. When in a relationship, they behave appropriately for what the situation or their role demands. For example, if the relationship is in the courting stage, the Inspector will exhibit courting behaviors, such as giving boxes of candy, red roses, and presents. These are worthwhile and important traditions to uphold and observe because they give direct evidence of commitment.[1]

Notable Inspectors[edit]

According to Keirsey, Queen Elizabeth II may be an Inspector.

For illustrative purposes, Keirsey and his son, David M. Keirsey,[3] have identified well-known individuals whose behavior is consistent with a specific type. Unless otherwise noted, the categorization of the individuals below, whether living or dead, as Inspectors is a matter of expert opinion rather than the result of the named individual taking a personality type inventory.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Keirsey.com". Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  2. ^ Keirsey, David (1998). Please Understand Me II: Temperament, Character, Intelligence. Del Mar, CA: Prometheus Nemesis Book Company. ISBN 1-885705-02-6. 
  3. ^ "FindArticles". Market Wire. 2005. Retrieved 2008-08-03. 

External links[edit]