Institute for Family Health

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The Institute for Family Health is a not-for-profit health organization. Founded in 1983, the Institute is one of the largest community health centers in New York State. It serves over 85,000 patients annually[1] at 26 locations[2] in the Bronx, Manhattan and the mid-Hudson Valley.[3] The Institute is a federally qualified health center (FQHC) network.[4][5] Like all Community Health Centers, the Institute accepts all patients regardless of their ability to pay and is governed by a board that has a majority of health center patients.[6] The Institute offers primary care, mental health, dental care, and social work, among other services.[7] The Institute is accredited by the Joint Commission[8] and recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance as a Level 3 patient-centered medical home.[9] The Institute also leads programs and conducts research to address racial and ethnic disparities in health, advance the use of health information technology, and improve care for diabetes, depression, women’s health, and HIV.[10] The Institute trains health students and professionals at all levels, including the operation of three family medicine residency programs: the Beth Israel Residency Program in Urban Family Practice, the Mid-Hudson Residency in Family Practice and the Harlem Residency in Family Medicine.[11][12][13]

History[edit]

The Institute was founded in 1984 by an interdisciplinary group comprising two family physicians, a family nurse practitioner and a behavioral scientist. Since its inception, the organization has been led by Neil Calman, MD, President and CEO.[14] The Institute began as a small private non-profit that received federal funds to open a Faculty Development Program in Urban Primary Care, which it ran for twenty years. In 1985, it contracted with Bronx-Lebanon Hospital to re-organize its outpatient department into a family practice center, and initiated its first residency training program in family medicine. It worked with Bronx Lebanon until 1999, and jointly developed several small community-based medical practices.

In 1986, the Institute acquired the Sidney Hillman Health Center in Union Square from the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union and turned the-multi-specialty practice into a family practice. In 1994, the Institute developed a relationship with Beth Israel Medical Center, and began the Beth Israel Residency in Urban Family Practice,[15] opening the Phillips Family Practice to serve as the ambulatory care training site for those residents.[16] Simultaneously, the Institute was building and opening a series of small family practice sites. Between 1991 through 1998, the Institute opened the Parkchester Family Practice, Walton Family Health Center, Urban Horizons Family Health Center, East 13th Street Family Practice, and the Mount Hope Family Practice.[17] In 1999, the Institute received an award from the Centers for Disease Control to initiate Bronx Health REACH, a consortium of community and faith based organizations committed to the elimination of racial disparities in health in the South Bronx.[18] The group addresses issues related to nutrition and fitness education; access to healthy foods and safe places to exercise; diabetes maintenance and prevention; school food and exercise programs; and the segregation of health care in academic medical centers.[19] In 2007, the Institute was named a Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities.[20] In 2000, the Institute implemented a system-wide electronic health record and practice management system, Epic. The system has altered the way care is delivered by allowing for increased care coordination and preventive care. The EHR also enables research in health processes and outcomes, and has permitted the Institute to participate in a number of federal and state payment initiatives such as Primary Care Medical Homes[21] and achieve Meaningful Use[22] designation.

In 2006, the Institute assumed responsibility for three practices operated by St. Christopher’s, Inc. As a result, it obtained Article 31 licensure to operate two community mental health programs in the Bronx. A year later, the Institute acquired six health centers and the Mid Hudson Family Practice Residency Program in the Mid-Hudson Valley, which doubled the organizational budget, the number of staff, and the number of patients served.[23] In 2010, when North General Hospital in East Harlem closed, the Institute opened a community health center on the first floor of the former hospital.[24] Two years later, the Institute moved this practice to the newly built Family Health Center of Harlem, two blocks away, which serves as the home of its third residency program, the Harlem Residency in Family Medicine.[25][26] In 2012, the Institute opened the Stevenson Family Health Center in the Soundview section of the Bronx, preserving access to care as well as jobs in this underserved and geographically isolated community.[27][28]

Current Activities[edit]

Mission[edit]

The mission of the Institute for Family Health is to "improve access to high quality, patient-centered primary health care targeted to the needs of medically underserved communities."[29]

Health Services[edit]

The Institute accepts most private insurance plans, Medicare, Medicaid and patients without insurance.[30] Services provided by the Institute for Family Health include: primary care, behavioral health, dental care, women’s health, prenatal care and delivery, health care for teens, diabetes care, HIV care, some specialty care, home visit services, WIC, Veterans services, free clinics, homeless health care, school based health care, insurance enrollment, and social services.[31]

Locations[edit]

The Institute for Family Health has over 26 health centers[32] located in the Bronx, Manhattan and the Mid Hudson Valley.[33][34]

Recognition[edit]

Over the years, the Institute has garnered a number of awards for their work, including the RWJ Community Health Leadership Award;[35] the Pew Charitable Trust Primary Care Achievement Award;[36] the American Academy of Family Physicians Public Health Award;[37] the Physician’s IT Leadership Award and Davies Public Health Award from the Health Information Management System Society;[38] the CDC Center of Excellence in Public Health Informatics with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Columbia University;[39] the National Physician Advocacy Merit Award from the Institute on Medicine as a Profession; the New York Times Nonprofit Excellence Awards;[40] the Kanter Prize for the elimination of disparities;[41][42] and the Felix A. Fishman Award for Extraordinary Advocacy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2012 Health Center Profile". Primary Care: The Health Center Program. Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  2. ^ "Hospital to Honor the Institute for Family Health at Annual Gala". Ellenville Regional Hospital. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  3. ^ "About Us". The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  4. ^ "Find a Health Center". Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  5. ^ "The Institute for Family Health". Family Medicine and Community Health: About Us. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  6. ^ "What is a Health Center". About Health Centers. Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  7. ^ "2012 Health Center Profile". Primary Care: The Health Center Program. Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  8. ^ "Certified Organizations". The Joint Commission. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  9. ^ "Leveraging Health IT to Achieve Ambulatory Quality". Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  10. ^ "Priority Areas". The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  11. ^ "Hospital to Honor The Institute for Family Health at Annual Gala". Ellenville Regional Hospital. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  12. ^ "Institute for Family Health". Programs by Sponsor. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  13. ^ "Beth Israel Medical Center". Programs by Sponsor. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  14. ^ "History". About Us. The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  15. ^ Schiller, Red. "Teaching Health Centers: Expansion of Existing Program". Medical Education Futures. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  16. ^ "History". About Us. The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  17. ^ "History". About Us. The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  18. ^ "About Us". Bronx Health Reach. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  19. ^ Calman, Neil (March 2005). "Making Health Equality A Reality: The Bronx Takes Action". Health Affairs 24 (2): 491–498. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.24.2.491. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  20. ^ "About Us". Bronx Health Reach. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  21. ^ "Patient Centered Medical Home Resource Center". Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  22. ^ "Meaningful Use". Policymaking, Regulation & Strategy. HealthIT.gov. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  23. ^ "PCDC Helps The Institute for Family Health Save Primary Care for 43,000 Patients". Press Releases. Primary Care Development Corporation. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  24. ^ Hartocollis, Anna (2010-06-28). "North General Hospital Is Closing, but Clinics Are Ready to Take Its Place". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  25. ^ Feeney, Michael J. (2013-09-18). "$28 million E. Harlem health center could provide more than just primary medical care". New York Daily News. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  26. ^ "Institute for Family Health Receives Teaching Health Center Funding to Launch Family Medicine Residency in Harlem". News. Harlem Residency in Family Medicine. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  27. ^ Wisnieski, Adam (7/5/2012). "New health center to replace Soundview". The Riverdale Press. Retrieved 2013-12-20.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  28. ^ Gershman, Jacob (7/1/2012). "Familiar Face to Run Espada's Clinic". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2013-12-20.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  29. ^ "Mission". About Us. Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  30. ^ "The Institute for Family Health". 2012 Health Center Profile. Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  31. ^ "Services". Health Care. The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  32. ^ "Hospital to Honor The Institute for Family Health at Annual Gala". News. Ellenville Regional. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  33. ^ "Locations". Health Care. The Institute for Family Health. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  34. ^ Hartocollis, Amanda (2010-06-28). "North General Hospital Is Closing, but Clinics Are Ready to Take Its Place". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  35. ^ "Neil Calman, M.D.". Community Health Leaders. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  36. ^ "Curriculum Vitae". Neil S Calman MD. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  37. ^ "Public Health Award Recipients 1989 to Present". American Academy of Family Physicians. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  38. ^ "2010 Davies Award Winners". Davies Award Recipient Manuscripts Archive. Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  39. ^ "AIMA 2010 Daily Schedules". AmiA. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  40. ^ "2013 Nonprofit Excellence Awards". Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  41. ^ "The Commonwealth Fund Connection". The Commonwealth Fund. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 
  42. ^ "Neil Calman, MD Receives $25,000 Kanter Prize for Addressing Disparities in Healthcare". Minority News. Black Radio Network. Retrieved 2013-12-20. 

External links[edit]