Institute in Basic Life Principles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Institute in Basic Life Principles
Founded 1961
Founder Bill Gothard
Type 501(c)3 non-profit religious
Location
Area served
US, 12 countries[citation needed]
Employees
200[citation needed]
Volunteers
1,000[citation needed]
Slogan Giving the World a "New" Approach to Life!
Website www.iblp.org

The Institute in Basic Life Principles (IBLP) is a non-denominational, Christian organization in Oak Brook, Illinois that serves as an umbrella organization for several ministries. IBLP was established by Bill Gothard for the purpose of resolving youth and family conflicts. IBLP's stated purpose is to provide instruction on how to find success in life by following biblical principles. It is a non-profit tax-exempt religious or charitable organization as defined by the IRS.[1]

History[edit]

Gothard founded Campus Teams in 1961, which derived from his master’s thesis at Wheaton Graduate School on a potential youth program which may have benefits in decreasing the number of wayward youth.[citation needed] The organization changed its name to Institute in Basic Youth Conflicts (IBYC) in 1974, and adopted its current name in 1989 (to reflect its expansion beyond traditional teenage issues). IBLP started promoting Basic Youth Conflicts seminars in areas around the United States and other nations, which according to its own history, during the 1970s had attendances of up to 20,000 persons.[2]

In the 1980s, the organization faced "a major sex scandal" when Gothard’s brother, Steve Gothard, resigned as administrative director after having affairs with several secretaries of the institute."[3] Bill Gothard, who was accused of knowing about the affairs but did not take action, resigned.[4] He then returned as organization head three weeks later.[5]

IBLP's programs have keys services, which include seminars for ministry, community outreach, troubled youth mentoring, and an international ministry. They all deal with education and contributing to the community. According to the IBLP, many of the ministry's workers have received (and continue to receive) Presidential medals for their work in helping the community in various ways.[6]

In 2006, it was reported to earn $63 million annually.[7]

By 2009 to 2012 the Institute in Basic Life Principles began a steady decline, losing money, assets, and greatly decreasing the number of annual seminars it conducted, while allegations of sexual misconduct became more public.[8]

In 2014, Bill Gothard resigned as President of IBLP until after reports that he had sexually harassed multiple women and failed to report allegations of child abuse in the organization. Gothard allegedly selected young women for administrative positions within the organization, then manipulated and harassed them while in his employment.[9] An investigation into the allegations concluded he "acted inappropriately," but "not criminally."[10]

Programs offered by the IBLP[edit]

Seminars[edit]

  • Basic Seminar—The introduction to the basic teachings of Gothard and IBLP. The seminar is 32 hours in length, typically held over a period of six days. It focuses on seven "Basic Life Principles": Design, Authority, Responsibility, Suffering, Ownership, Freedom, and Success. These are designed to help the individual "view all of life from God's perspective." Basic Seminar "alumni" can re-attend the Basic Seminar free of charge.[11]
  • Advanced Seminar—Continues on the principles taught in the Basic Seminar. One must have attended the Basic Seminar in order to attend the Advanced Seminar. The Advanced Seminar primarily focuses on the areas of Marriage, Family, and Finances.[12]
  • Anger Resolution Seminar—A specialized seminar dealing with anger issues. Much of the material presented in this seminar is adapted from the Basic, but presented in a way geared to resolving anger issues. No prior Seminar attendance is required.[13]
  • Financial Freedom Seminar—A 16-hour video seminar taught by Jim Sammons explaining financial principles from the Bible.[14]

References[edit]

External links[edit]