Integral politics

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Integral politics is an endeavor to develop a balanced and comprehensive politics around the principles of integral studies. Theorists including Don Beck, Lawrence Chickering, Jack Crittenden, David Sprecher, and Ken Wilber have applied concepts such as the AQAL methodology of Integral Theory to issues in political philosophy and applications in government.[1]

An example of an application of integral politics is a proposal for a world federal constitution informed by integral philosophy such as that proposed by Steve McIntosh in Integral Consciousness and the Future of Evolution. According to McIntosh, an integral world federation would provide democratic oversight of the international economy, protect the global environment, defend human rights, and preserve multicultural diversity. Its ultimate aim is described as an end to war, disease, and poverty.[2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Ken Wilber (2000). A Theory of Everything: An Integral Vision for Business, Politics, Science and Spirituality, p. 153. Boston: Shambhala Publications. ISBN 1-57062-855-6
  2. ^ Steve McIntosh (2007). Integral Consciousness and the Future of Evolution, p. 311. St. Paul, Minn.: Paragon House. ISBN 2-00-702197-6

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