Interconnectivity

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Interconnectivity refers to the state or quality of being connected together. The concept is widely used in various fields such as biology, network theory, and ecology. It can be further elaborated as all parts of a system, which interact with one another and cannot be analyzed if considered alone. Despite subtle differences in meaning, interconnectivity is often related to the ideas of interconnectedness and interdependence.

Networks[edit]

As soon as a network joins computers and their peripheral devices, interconnecting such networks may be beneficial. Interconnectivity between networks signifies not only allowing data transfer, but restricting the link to advantageous exchanges. Network users, therefore, may have access to restrictive functions on the interconnected network.

Interconnectivity for human networks means the ability of small groups, having the same goals, to link up other groups. Such connections tend to be more difficult on a global scale, where groups have distinguished languages, values, or cultures. The interconnectivity of these groups evaluates how easily they can connect. As global interconnectivity grows rapidly, there exist some positive views regarding the global village. Kishore Mahbubani, Dean of the National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, asserts that,

"With global interconnectivity growing by leaps and bounds, the spread of information and ideas means our moral compasses will expand beyond national borders. It is only a matter of time before all of us look beyond the horizon and become citizens of both our own country and of our planet. The world will be a better place when we unite to strengthen our global village."[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]