Intermountain Healthcare

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Intermountain Health Care, Inc.
Type Private (Non-profit)
Industry Healthcare
Predecessor(s) The Health Services Corporation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Founded Salt Lake City, Utah, United States (September 24, 1970 (1970-09-24))
Founder(s) Presiding Bishopric of Presiding
Headquarters Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Area served Utah and Idaho, United States
Key people Charles W. Sorenson, Jr., MD
(President / CEO)
Kem C. Gardner
(Chairman of the Board)
Website intermountainhealthcare.org

Intermountain Health Care, Inc., officially doing business as Intermountain Healthcare, is a non-profit healthcare system and is the largest healthcare provider in the Intermountain West. Until 2005 it was known as Intermountain Health Care or more commonly IHC; it is now often referred to as simply Intermountain for short. Intermountain Healthcare provides hospital and other medical services in Utah and Idaho and also offers integrated managed care under the insurance brand SelectHealth. Intermountain Healthcare is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and currently employs over 32,000 people.

History[edit]

Intermountain Health Care, Inc. (IHC) logo 1975-2005

Intermountain Healthcare was founded on 1 April 1975. Prior to Intermountain, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints operated many of the hospitals in the region. The church decided in 1974 it would no longer operate the hospitals and decided it would donate its fifteen hospitals as a system to the intermountain community. The church did this on the condition that a not-for-profit organization would be formed to operate the hospitals on behalf of the communities they served.

Since its inception, board members of Intermountain Healthcare have been unpaid volunteers. Raising funds was done through the bond market and within just a few years, several additional hospitals asked to join the Intermountain organization. Intermountain's hospital market share (about 45 percent of Utah's hospital beds) has remained consistent since the organization was formed.

In 1982, Intermountain Healthcare began providing non-hospital services such as clinics and home healthcare. Four additional hospitals were added from 1982 to 1990. In 1991, Intermountain was recipient of The Healthcare Forum/Witt award.

In the mid-1990s, Intermountain Healthcare restructured into three major groups: hospitals, physicians, and health plans.

In 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005, Intermountain Healthcare was ranked No. 1 (among nearly 600 evaluated) integrated healthcare systems in the U.S. by Modern Healthcare magazine and the Verispan research firm. The rankings measured efficiency, communication cost and quality of care. Intermountain is the only organization to have been ranked No. 1 five times. Intermountain has been named the No. 2 integrated health system in the country in 2001, 2006 and 2007. Intermountain has also received several other awards for the organization's pioneering use of electronic medical records and evidence-based medical care guidelines.

In 2002, Intermountain served as the Medical Services Provider for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

In November 2005, Intermountain implemented a new logo and slightly changed the spelling of its name from Intermountain Health Care to Intermountain Healthcare. The purpose was to reflect today's more common spelling of "healthcare." Up until this time, Intermountain was well known as "IHC." In April 2006, Intermountain renamed its health insurance plan "SelectHealth" and formalized the separate management of the insurance side of the organization.[1] The move helped to appease some critics who complained about the difficulty of competing against an organization that offered insurance, hospitals, and clinics through one system.

Intermountain has sometimes been subject to review by the Utah State Legislature because of the hospital organization's nonprofit mission and because they own 20 of Utah's 60 hospitals. However, proposals by competitors to force Intermountain to sell off either the insurance or hospital components of the organization have been fruitless.

In 2005 the Utah State Legislature hired an outside research company to review Utah's healthcare marketplace. While the independent experts did not address all of the challenges facing Utah's healthcare industry, the researchers did conclude that "considerable evidence exists to support the conclusion that Utah's health-care markets are performing competitively. . . Intervention by the Utah Legislature to promote competition in these markets is not necessary." The six-month study recommended that the Utah legislature refrain from creating more regulations for Utah's healthcare marketplace stating, "Competitive markets are more likely to be harmed than helped by regulatory directives."

In 2009, Intermountain Healthcare was identified as a healthcare model by President Barack Obama, ""We have long known that some places, like the Intermountain Healthcare in Utah. . ., offer high-quality care at cost below average."[2] According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, Utah's per capita spending on healthcare is 44 percent below the national average.[2]

Intermountain Healthcare announced that beginning in 2011 it would offer health insurance benefits for its employees' domestic partners.[3]

As of 2013, Intermountain Healthcare operates 22 hospitals in Utah and 1 hospital in Idaho. Intermountain also operates clinics, and urgent care facilities that are run by physicians as part of the Intermountain Medical Group. In total, Intermountain Healthcare operates over 160 healthcare facilities, employs about 700 of Utah's 4,600 physicians and provides insurance to about 19 percent of Utah.

Hospitals[edit]

As of 2011, Intermountain Healthcare operates 23 hospitals in Utah and Idaho as listed in the table below:

Facility Name City State Licensed Beds Staffed Beds Designation Coordinates
Alta View Hospital Sandy Utah 80 72 40°34′39.2″N 111°51′11.8″W / 40.577556°N 111.853278°W / 40.577556; -111.853278 (Alta View Hospital)
American Fork Hospital American Fork Utah 117 117 40°22′50.1″N 111°46′9.3″W / 40.380583°N 111.769250°W / 40.380583; -111.769250 (American Fork Hospital)
Bear River Valley Hospital Tremonton Utah 20 14 41°43′32.4″N 112°10′52.8″W / 41.725667°N 112.181333°W / 41.725667; -112.181333 (Bear River Valley Hospital)
Cassia Regional Medical Center Burley Idaho 25 25 42°32′3.3″N 113°47′0.5″W / 42.534250°N 113.783472°W / 42.534250; -113.783472 (Cassia Regional Medical Center)
Delta Community Medical Center Delta Utah 20 20 39°21′1.8″N 112°33′35.2″W / 39.350500°N 112.559778°W / 39.350500; -112.559778 (Delta Community Medical Center)
Dixie Regional Medical Center St. George Utah 245 245 37°5′56.8″N 113°34′30″W / 37.099111°N 113.57500°W / 37.099111; -113.57500 (Dixie Regional Medical Center - 400 East Campus)
37°5′59.1″N 113°33′15″W / 37.099750°N 113.55417°W / 37.099750; -113.55417 (Dixie Regional Medical Center - River Road Campus)
Fillmore Community Medical Center Fillmore Utah 20 8 38°57′9.9″N 112°20′26.4″W / 38.952750°N 112.340667°W / 38.952750; -112.340667 (Fillmore Community Medical Center)
Garfield Memorial Hospital & Clinics Panguitch Utah 14 14 37°49′28.7″N 112°25′40.5″W / 37.824639°N 112.427917°W / 37.824639; -112.427917 (Garfield Memorial Hospital & Clinics)
Heber Valley Medical Center Heber Utah 20 20 40°31′49.2″N 111°24′32.4″W / 40.530333°N 111.409000°W / 40.530333; -111.409000 (Heber Valley Medical Center)
Intermountain Medical Center Salt Lake City Utah 440 440 Level I trauma center 40°39′43.2″N 111°53′35.7″W / 40.662000°N 111.893250°W / 40.662000; -111.893250 (Intermountain Medical Center)
LDS Hospital Salt Lake City Utah 350 200 40°46′42.6″N 111°52′50″W / 40.778500°N 111.88056°W / 40.778500; -111.88056 (LDS Hospital)
Logan Regional Hospital Logan Utah 148 126 Level III trauma center 41°45′26.8″N 111°49′16″W / 41.757444°N 111.82111°W / 41.757444; -111.82111 (Logan Regional Hospital)
McKay-Dee Hospital Center Ogden Utah 344 311 Level II trauma center 41°11′0.1″N 111°56′56.3″W / 41.183361°N 111.948972°W / 41.183361; -111.948972 (McKay-Dee Hospital Center)
Orem Community Hospital Orem Utah 20 18 40°18′11.4″N 111°42′18.6″W / 40.303167°N 111.705167°W / 40.303167; -111.705167 (Orem Community Hospital)
Park City Medical Center Park City Utah 30 30 Level IV Trauma Center 40°40′52.8″N 111°27′58.7″W / 40.681333°N 111.466306°W / 40.681333; -111.466306 (Park City Medical Center)
Primary Children's Hospital Salt Lake City Utah 289 289 Level I trauma center 40°46′1.4″N 111°50′18.4″W / 40.767056°N 111.838444°W / 40.767056; -111.838444 (Primary Children's Hospital)
Riverton Hospital Riverton Utah 58 58 40°31′20.5″N 111°58′47.7″W / 40.522361°N 111.979917°W / 40.522361; -111.979917 (Riverton Hospital)
Sanpete Valley Hospital Mt. Pleasant Utah 20 15 39°31′56″N 111°27′40.3″W / 39.53222°N 111.461194°W / 39.53222; -111.461194 (Sanpete Valley Hospital)
Sevier Valley Medical Center Richfield Utah 42 26 38°46′53.7″N 112°5′5.6″W / 38.781583°N 112.084889°W / 38.781583; -112.084889 (Sevier Valley Medical Center)
The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH) Murray Utah 36 36 40°38′35.3″N 111°52′56.6″W / 40.643139°N 111.882389°W / 40.643139; -111.882389 (The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH))
Utah Valley Regional Medical Center Provo Utah 395 367 Level II trauma center 40°14′50.7″N 111°40′1.6″W / 40.247417°N 111.667111°W / 40.247417; -111.667111 (Utah Valley Regional Medical Center)
Valley View Medical Center Cedar City Utah 48 48 37°42′0″N 113°3′50.6″W / 37.70000°N 113.064056°W / 37.70000; -113.064056 (Valley View Medical Center)

Former hospitals[edit]

Life Flight[edit]

Intermountain Healthcare Life Flight logo (since 2005)

Intermountain Life Flight, Intermountain Healthcare's air ambulance unit, provides emergency air transportation as well as non-emergency transport for victims particularly in remote areas, as well as emergency scenes where time is critical. In addition to transport, Life Flight also provides search-and-rescue services to the region. It currently consists of five helicopters and three fixed-wing aircraft.

Life Flight originally began service in 1972 with just fixed-winged aircraft, but on 6 July 1978 it performed its first patient transport by helicopter, becoming the seventh helicopter (rotor wing) air medical service in the United States.[4]

Intermountain currently operates two Agusta A109K2 helicopters, one Agusta AW109 SP Grand, and two Bell 407 helicopters. The helicopters are based at McKay-Dee Hospital Center in Odgen, Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, and Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George. Life Flight also operates three Beechcraft B200 King Air twin-turboprop aircraft. Two are based at Life Flight's operations center at the Salt Lake City International Airport, and the third is based at St. George Municipal Airport.[5] The helicopters generally service an area 150 mile around their base, but can travel 1,000 miles without refueling. In addition to servicing Utah, Life Flight transports patients from Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and other locations in the Western United States.[6]

Life Flight and its staff are Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS) certified. All of Life Flight's helicopters routinely use night vision goggles (NVG) and its Agusta Grands can operate in high-altitude situations. Life Flight can can provide a medical control physician 24/7 so it staff does not have to rely solely on standing orders or protocols, as do many other similar air medical services. Life Flight has six teams:[7]

  • Adult Team
  • Pediatric Team - Life Flight is the only air ambulance service with nurses specially trained to care for infants and children (ages 0–18) that operates in the Intermountain West.[8]
  • Neonatal Team - Life Flight performs about 1,200 neonatal transports each year
  • Respiratory Team
  • LVAD Team - Assisting those patients in need of a ventricular assist device
  • Hoist / Search & Rescue Team - Life Flight has performed hoist rescues since 2001; in fact, it is the first and only civilian air ambulance service in the United States that conducts hoist rescues[8] and the only such service in the intermountian region.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fantin, Linda (4 Apr 2006). "IHC Health Plans changing name". The Salt Lake Tribune (Salt Lake City). Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Daley, John (10 Sep 2009). "Obama singles out Intermountain Healthcare as model system". ksl.com (Salt Lake City: Deseret Digital Media). Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  3. ^ Giauque, Marc (21 Oct 2010). "Intermountain Healthcare offers benefits to domestic partners". ksl.com (Salt Lake City: Deseret Digital Media). Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  4. ^ "Intermountain Life Flight - Adult and Children’s Critical Care Specialists". HeliMx. 1 Oct 2012. Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  5. ^ "Life Flight > About Life Flight > Aircraft". Intermountaion Healthcare. Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  6. ^ "Life Flight > About Life Flight > Bases". Intermountaion Healthcare. Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  7. ^ "Life Flight > About Life Flight > Teams". Intermountaion Healthcare. Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Intermountain Life Flight goes live with GrandNew". Helihub. 3 Jul 2012. Retrieved 25 Apr 2013. 

External links[edit]