International American Council

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The International American Council provides a global and advisory analysis which draws on a worldwide network of experts.[1] It assists and advise its clients for political, economic, cultural, business, and strategic landscapes. These policies, strategies and insight have enabled many people around the world to succeed in a world where the intersection of politics, culture, economics, and business is critical.[1]

International American Council on Middle East and North Africa (IAC) offers policies and news focusing on essential issues regarding the advancement of the politico-economic relationships between the United States, the Middle East, North Africa and other Muslim countries.[1] Majid Rafizadeh, the internationally acclaimed author, human rights activists and political specialist,[2] is the president and co-founder of this association.

Culture[edit]

The International American Council on Middle East and North Africa (IAC) seeks to promote social justice, democracy, rule of law, equal rights, freedom of speech, press, and assembly in Muslim and Middle Eastern countries. It provides policies, strategies, insights and events from Israel, Turkey, Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Egypt.


International American Council on Middle East is accessible in four languages: Arabic, English, Hebrew and Persian. International American Council on Middle East and Muslims seeks to bridge the socio-cultural differences between the United States, Middle East and other Muslim countries. International American Council provides a global and advisory analysis which draws on a worldwide network of professors and experts who are also on the advisory board.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "International American Council | Middle East and North Africa". Iaccouncil.org. Retrieved 2014-05-19. 
  2. ^ "CNN Video - Breaking News Videos from CNN.com". Edition.cnn.com. Retrieved 2013-08-18. 
  3. ^ "Nancy Gallagher - UCSB Department of History". History.ucsb.edu. Retrieved 2013-08-18. 

External links[edit]