International Association for Feminist Economics

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International Association for Feminist Economics
International Association for Feminist Economics logo.png
Abbreviation IAFFE
Formation 1992
Type NGO
Legal status Association
Purpose Our common cause is to further gender-aware and inclusive economic inquiry and policy analysis with the goal of enhancing the well-being of children, women, and men in local, national, and transnational communities.
Professional title
International Association for Feminist Economics
Headquarters University of Nebraska–Lincoln, US
Location
Coordinates 40°49′03″N 96°42′05″W / 40.81750°N 96.70139°W / 40.81750; -96.70139Coordinates: 40°49′03″N 96°42′05″W / 40.81750°N 96.70139°W / 40.81750; -96.70139
Region served
Members in 64 countries
Membership
600
President
Alicia Girón
President-Elect
Şemsa Özar

The International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE) is a non-profit international association dedicating to raising awareness and inquiry of feminist economics. It has approximately six hundred members in sixty-four countries.[1] The association publishes a quarterly journal entitled Feminist Economics.[2] Since 1998 IAFFE has held NGO special consultative status.[3]

The organization is made up of 'chapters' which conduct panel meetings alongside the meetings of other economic groups such as, the European Association for Evolutionary and Political Economy (EAEPE) and the American Economic Association (AEA).

History[edit]

In 1990 Diana Strassman organized a panel named, Can feminism find a home in economics? Members of the audience were invited specifically, by Jean Shackelford and April Aerni, to join a start-up network for economists which would be overtly feminist in outlook. In 1992 this network became the International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE) with Shackleford becoming their first president.[4]

In 1998 IAFFE was made an NGO with special consultative status to the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC).[3]

By 2003 IAFFE had more than five hundred members from over thirty countries.[4] The association's president from 2003 to 2004 was Lourdes Benería. Shahra Razavi paid tribute to Benería in a speech at the IAFFE conference in 2012 describing Benería's work as, "not only empirically grounded and conceptually informed, but also contributing to a feminist critique that is systemic and connected to a broader critique of capitalism".[5]

IAFFE was awarded a grant of $1.5 million in 2010 from the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA), to continue their work, including the publication of special issues of Feminist Economics.[6] Since then the association has gone on to number six hundred members in sixty-four countries.[1]

Chapters[edit]

European chapter[edit]

At the same time as IAFFE was setting up, a separate group of women, including Edith Kuiper, in the Netherlands organized a conference on feminist perspectives on economic theory called Out of the Margins. The conference brought many like minded people together who continued to network with one another and be involved in groups and activism, sometimes involving the IAFFE. (Another small group of Dutch economists founded another organization named FENN, the Feminist Economics Network in the Netherlands). In 1998, at a second Amsterdam conference, arrangements were made to hold the first meeting of IAFFE European chapter.[7]

The first official meeting of IAFFE Europe took place in Brussels in November 1998, there were twenty-five participants from ten countries and, as a result of the meeting, an e-mail list was created. Information about futures sessions and a report of the first meeting was sent to those interested, this led to more IAFFE panels (in 1999 and 2000) being organized for meetings of the European Association for Evolutionary and Political Economy (EAEPE).[7]

The European chapter of IAFFE continued to meet and Ailsa McKay, professor of economics at Glasgow Caledonian University, was its chair until her death in March 2014.[8]

Australian and New Zealand Association for Feminist Economics (ANZAFFE)[edit]

The Out of the Margins conference resulted in a network of contacts being formed, one of these networks gradually became the Australian and New Zealand Association for Feminist Economics (ANZAFFE), a chapter of IAFFE. The chapter includes a small feminist economics group in Wellington, New Zealand led by Prue Hyman.[7]

United States chapter[edit]

The American chapter of IAFFE hold sessions at the American Economic Association's (AEA) annual meetings.[7]

The Rhonda Williams Prize[edit]

IAFFE offer a prize scholarship in memory of former associate editor of Feminist Economics (1994–1998), Rhonda Williams. In 2014 the amount awarded was $1,500 to be given out at their summer conference to allow underrepresented groups in IAFFE attend the conference and present a paper.

Award winners must demonstrate a commitment to one or more of the following issues: inequalities; interrelationships (racism, sexism, homophobia, and classism); and connections between scholarship and activism. Funding is provided by both Routledge and, Taylor & Francis.[9] Award winners must demonstrate a commitment to one or more of the following issues: inequalities; interrelationships (racism, sexism, homophobia, and classism); and connections between scholarship and activism. Funding is provided by both Routledge and, Taylor & Francis.[9]

Conferences[edit]

IAFFE takes part in Allied Social Sciences Association's (ASSA) annual conference every year.[10] It also has its own annual conferences.

List of IAFFE Conferences
# Year Place Theme
1st 1992 New Orleans, Louisana, USA Feminist economic inquiry.[7]
2nd 1993 Washington, DC, USA Feminist economic inquiry.[7]
3rd 1994 Beijing, China Feminist economic inquiry.[11]
4th 1995 Tours, France Feminist economic inquiry.[12]
5th 1996 American University, Washington DC, USA Feminist economic inquiry.[13]
6th 1997 Taxco, Mexico Feminist economic inquiry.[14]
7th 1998 Amsterdam, Netherlands Feminist approaches to economics.[15]
8th 1999 Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada Feminist economic inquiry.[16]
9th 2000 Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey Feminist economic inquiry.[17]
10th 2001 Holmenkollen Hotel, Oslo, Norway Feminist economic inquiry.[18]
11th 2002 Occidental College, California, USA Feminist economic inquiry.[19]
12th 2003 The Centre for Gender and Development Studies, The University of the West Indies, Barbados, West Indies Feminist economic inquiry.[20]
13th 2004 St Hilda's College, Oxford, England Feminist economic inquiry.[21]
14th 2005 Washington DC, USA Feminist economic inquiry.[22]
15th 2006 Sydney, Australia Feminist economic inquiry.[23]
16th 2007 Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand Feminist economic inquiry.[24]
17th 2008 Torino, Italy Women's work and education in the global economy.[25]
18th 2009 Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA Global economic crises impacts women differently.[26]
19th 2010 Buenos Aires, Argentina Global economic crises and feminist rethinking of the development discourse.[27]
20th 2011 Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, China Reorienting economic theory, policies, and institutions: Feminist perspectives in the aftermath of the global economic crisis.[28]
21st 2012 Barcelona, Spain Human well-being for the 21st century: weaving alliances from feminist economics[29]
22nd 2013 Stanford University, Palo Alto, California Feminist economists’ perspectives on women’s education and work across the globe[30]
23rd 2014 Accra, Ghana Women’s economic empowerment and the new global development agenda.[31]
24th 2015 Boston, Massachusetts, USA Papers invited on the issues of: Gender, monetary and fiscal policies / Women’s employment, families and austerity programs / Deflation and gender in a complex global world / Women’s employment and Central Bank policies during the post-crisis period economic empowerment, ethics and gender development / Gender, microcredit and microfinance.[32]

Grants[edit]

List of some of the grants awarded to the IAFFE
Year Awarding body / organization Amount Purpose of grant
2010 Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) $1,500,000 US IAFFE work and special issues of Feminist Economics.[6]
2011 Ford Foundation $250,000 US In support of a project on "Land, Gender, and Food Security".[33]
2014 Routledge and Taylor & Francis $1,500 US The Rhonda Williams Prize (see above).[9]

Association members[edit]

2014-15 Board of Directors[edit]

This is list of who is sitting on the board of IAFFE.[34]


Additional board members[edit]

Past presidents[edit]

This is a list of presidents of the IAFFE.[34]

Publications[edit]

Journals[edit]

Books by IAFFE members[edit]

  • Bahramitash, Roksana (2013). Gender and entrepreneurship in Iran: microenterprise and the informal sector. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 9781137342867. 
  • Bettio, Francesca; Plantenga, Janneke; Smith, Mark (2013). Gender and the European labour market. London New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415664332. 
  • Bjørnholt, Margunn; McKay, Ailsa (2014). Counting on Marilyn Waring: new advances in feminist economics. Bradford, Ontario: Demeter Press. ISBN 9781927335277. 
  • Blau, Francine D; Ferber, Marianne A; Winkler, Anne E (2014). The economics of women, men, and work (seventh ed.). Boston: Pearson. ISBN 9780132992817. 
  • Deshpande, Ashwini (2013). Affirmative action in India. New Delhi Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198092087. 
  • Dokmanović, Mirjana; Kuzmanović, Tatjana Đ. (2012). Guidelines for introducing gender budgeting at national level in the Republic of Serbia (in Serbian). Serbia: Gender Equality Directorate, Ministry of Labor, Employment and Social Policy. ISBN 9780132992817. 
  • Figart, Deborah M.; Warnecke, Tonia L. (2013). Handbook of research on gender and economic life. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. ISBN 9780857930941. 
  • Gornick, Janet C.; Jäntti, Markus (2013). Income inequality: economic disparities and the middle class in affluent countries. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. ISBN 9780804778244. 
  • Kabeer, Naila; Sudarshan, Ratna; Milward, Kirsty (2013). Organizing women workers in the informal economy: beyond the weapons of the weak. London New York: Zed Books. ISBN 9781780324517. 
  • Kalabikhina, Irina (2012). Economic and demographic development: gender transition - theory, indexes, prediction, policy. (in Russian). Russia: LAB Lambert Academic Publishing. 
  • Karamessini, Maria; Rubery, Jill (2014). Women and austerity: the economic crisis and the future for gender equality. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9780415815376. 
  • Mejiuni, Olutoyin (2013). Women and power: education, religion and identity. Dakar: CODESRIA. ISBN 9782869785731. 
  • Mills, Julie; Franzway, Suzanne; Gill, Judy; Sharp, Rhonda (2013). Challenging knowledge, sex and power: gender, work and engineering. New York: Routledge, IAFFE Book Series. ISBN 9780415676861. 
  • Tanaka, Shigeto (2013). A Quantitative Picture of Contemporary Japanese Families: Tradition and Modernity in the 21st Century. Sendai: Tohoku University Press. ISBN 9784861632266. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History". International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE). Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Purposes and activities". International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE). Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Willetts, Peter. "List Non-Governmental Organisations in Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations, as of August 2003 - ECOSOC Special Consultative Status". City University London. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 598. International Association for Feminist Economics 1998 
  4. ^ a b Nelson, Julie A.; Ferber, Marianne (2003), "Introduction - 'Beyond economic man', ten years later", in Nelson, Julie A.; Ferber, Marianne, Feminist economics today: beyond economic man, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, p. 7, ISBN 9780226242071 
  5. ^ Al-Adhami, Rheem; Razavi, Shahra (6 July 2012). "Paying Homage: Shahra Razavi on the life and work of feminist economist Lourdes Benería". United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD). Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  6. ^ a b "International feminist organization based at UNL earns $1.5 million grant". University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). 22 October 2010. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Nelson, Julie A.; Ferber, Marianne (2003), "Introduction - 'Beyond economic man', ten years later", in Nelson, Julie A.; Ferber, Marianne, Feminist economics today: beyond economic man, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 8–9, ISBN 9780226242071 
  8. ^ Stewart, Catriona (7 March 2014). "Tributes for Caley Uni professor Ailsa". Evening Times. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c "Upcoming Events". Diversifying Economic Quality (Div. E.Q.). Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  10. ^ "IAFFE Sessions at ASSA Conference". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  11. ^ Seiz, Janet. "IAFFE'S plans for the Beijing conference". Bucknell University, Department of Economics. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  12. ^ "4th annual summer conference of the International Association for Feminist Economics, Tours, France, July 5-7, 1995". Bucknell University, Department of Economics. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  13. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 1 (3): 158–163. Autumn 1995. doi:10.1080/714042258. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  14. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 2 (3): 183–191. Autumn 1996. doi:10.1080/13545709610001707906. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  15. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 4 (1): 167–169. Spring 1998. doi:10.1080/135457098338626. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  16. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 5 (1): 169–170. Spring 1999. doi:10.1080/135457099338238. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  17. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 6 (1): 159–162. Spring 2000. doi:10.1080/135457000337769. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  18. ^ "Information and announcements". Feminist Economics 6 (3): 159–162. Autumn 2000. doi:10.1080/135457000750020209. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  19. ^ "The IAFFE 2002 conference on Feminist Economics". Bucknell University, Department of Economics. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  20. ^ "The 2003 IAFFE Conference on Feminist Economics". Bucknell University, Department of Economics. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  21. ^ "Conference on Feminist Economics Oxford – August 5-7, 2004". Bucknell University, Department of Economics. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  22. ^ "14th Annual IAFFE Conference". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  23. ^ "2006 Annual Conference on Feminist Economics". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  24. ^ "16th Annual IAFFE Conference on Feminist Economics". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  25. ^ "17th Annual IAFFE Conference on Feminist Economics". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  26. ^ "Global economic crises impacts women differently: international feminist economists conference June 26-28". Simmons College. 22 June 2009. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  27. ^ "2010 Annual Conference - International Association for Feminist Economics". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  28. ^ "International Association for Feminist Economics Calls for Papers". Women's Studies Institute of China WSIC. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  29. ^ "IAFFE annual conference - Human well-being for the 21st century: weaving alliances from feminist economics". Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG). 27 June 2012. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  30. ^ "International Association for Feminist Economics Annual Conference". INOMICS. 10 April 2013. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  31. ^ "23rd IAFFE Annual Conference 2014 "Women’s economic empowerment and the new global development agenda" - International Association for Feminist Economics". EconBiz. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  32. ^ "Heterodox Economics Newsletter (no. 159) The International Association of Feminist Economics (IAFFE) calls for session proposals and individual papers at the ASSA meetings (Boston, 2015)". Heterodox Economics Newsletter. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  33. ^ "Feminist economics receives grant for food security". The Veterans Site and Greater Good. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  34. ^ a b "Board members". International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE). Retrieved 25 July 2014. 

External links[edit]