International Association for Media and History

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The International Association for Media and History (IAMHIST) is a scholarly organization which brings together media historians and professionals with an interest in media history. Founded in the summer of 1977 it organizes biennial conferences, which have typically rotated between venues in the UK, US and the continent of Europe. The Association has been especially associated with the study of the role of film, radio and television in the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War, and the advancement of the systematic use of audiovisual materials as historical sources. The organization produces the quarterly journal The Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television.

IAMHIST is an organisation of scholars dedicated to the research of the history of media.[1] The association publishes the journal Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television quarterly and hold yearly conferences explore different aspects of media, history, and cultural impact.[2][3][4]

It was not until 1999, at the IAMHIST conference hosted by the University of Leeds (UK), that academics and program makers involved in history and television from around the world met to analyze how different TV systems represent themselves, explore archive accessibility, and to discuss the future of television.[5] The conference contributed to a collection of essays in the book The Historian, Television, and Television History. ISBN 1-86020-586-0[6]

The association awards the bi-annual “IAMHIST Prize” for the best contribution on the subject of media and history to have been published or shown in the preceding two years, given to the book, radio or television programme or series, film, DVD, CDRom, or URL making that contribution.[7][8][9][10][11]

The current president is Nicholas Cull.

Additional reading[edit]

Dai, Xiudian (2000). The digital revolution and governance (illustrated ed.). Ashgate. p. 270. ISBN 9780754615187. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beyond google and singing fish, or other ways to find moving image collections". Information Today. 2004-02-01. Retrieved 2009-04-14. "The International Association for Media and History (IAMHIST) [1] maintains a useful set of resource links targeted at academics and moving image archivists" 
  2. ^ McKernan, Luke. "XXII Iamhist Conference, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 18–21 July 2007: Media And Imperialism—A Personal View". Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television (International Association of Media and History): 55–60. 
  3. ^ "IAMHIST conference 2009: Social Fears and Moral Panics, 8–11 July 2009, Aberystwyth.". criticalstudiesintelevision.com. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  4. ^ "IAMHIST conference 2009: Social Fears and Moral Panics". Aberystwyth University. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  5. ^ Gary R. Edgerton, Peter C. Rollins (2003). Television Histories: Shaping Collective Memory in the Media Age (2, illustrated ed.). University Press of Kentucky. p. 246. ISBN 9780813190563. 
  6. ^ Graham Roberts, Philip M. Taylor, Nicholas Pronay (2001). Philip M. Taylor and Graham Roberts, ed. The Historian, Television, and Television History. University of Luton Press. p. 181. ISBN 9781860205866. 
  7. ^ "Badenoch wins IAMHIST prize". tie-project.nl. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  8. ^ "Voices in Ruins Co-winner of the IAMHIST prize for the best work of media and history in the years 2007 -2008.". palgrave.com. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  9. ^ "Prize for Alexander Badenoch". hum.uu.nl. January 30, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  10. ^ "Carfax-IAMHIST Prize for Outstanding Articles, 2005". direct.bl.uk. British Library Direct. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  11. ^ "IAMHIST Prize for awork in Media and History awarded". iamhist.org. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 

External links[edit]