International Behavioral Neuroscience Society

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International Behavioral Neuroscience Society
IBNSlogo.jpg
Abbreviation IBNS
Formation 1992
Legal status Association
Purpose to encourage research and education in the field of behavioral neuroscience
Headquarters San Antonio, TX, USA
Region served Worldwide
Membership 800
President D. Caroline Blanchard
Main organ Council
Staff 1
Website IBNS Homepage

The International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS), was founded in 1992.[1][2] The goal of the IBNS is to "encourage research and education in the field of behavioral neuroscience". Its current president is D. Caroline Blanchard. Brain Research Bulletin,[3] Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews,[4] and Physiology and Behavior[5] are official journals of the IBNS.

Profile[edit]

Mission[edit]

The IBNS mission statement is to encourage research and education in the field of behavioral neuroscience[2] by:

  • Promoting and encouraging education and research with respect to behavioral neuroscience
  • Collaborating with existing public and private organizations to promote and encourage education and research in behavioral neuroscience[6]

Awards[edit]

Each year the IBNS recognizes top scientists in the field of behavioral neuroscience with:

  • The Matthew J. Wayner-NNOXe Pharmaceuticals Award for distinguished lifetime contributions to behavioral neuroscience[7]
  • Electing individuals who have made substantial contributions to the Society and to the field of behavioral neuroscience as Fellows[6]

In addition, the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society's award for "outstanding accomplishments in support of scientific research relevant to behavioral neuroscience" is given at irregular intervals. Past recipients include Richard K. Nakamura, Deputy Director of the National Institute for Mental Health.[8]

History[edit]

The Society was founded in 1992 with Matthew J. Wayner as its founding president. Other past-presidents have been Paul R. Sanberg (1993), Robert D. Meyer (1994), Linda P. Spear (1995), Gerard P. Smth (1996), Michael L. Woodruff (1997), Robert L. Isaacson (1998), Laszlo Lenard (1999), Jacqueline N. Crawley (2000), John P. Bruno (2001), Mark A. Geyer (2002), Robert Blanchard (2003), C. Sue Carter (2004) Robert Adamec, (2005), Joseph Huston (2006), and Robert Gerlai (2007–2008).[9] The immediate past-president is Kelly Lambert (2009–2010) and the current president is Caroline Blanchard.[10] The society organizes annual meetings[11] and parts of the presentations at these meetings are regularly published as supplements or special issues of peer-reviewed scientific journals.[12][13][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fledgling Neuroscience Society Provides Sharper Focus". 23 November 1992. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "International Behavioral Neuroscience Society - Homepage". Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  3. ^ "Brain Research Bulletin". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  4. ^ "Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews - Elsevier". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  5. ^ "Physiology & Behavior - Elsevier". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  6. ^ a b "IBNS Bylaws". Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  7. ^ "2008 IBNS Meeting Program" (PDF). Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  8. ^ "NIMH · Nakamura to receive prestigious IBNS Behavioral Neuroscience Award". Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  9. ^ "IBNS Past-Presidents". Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  10. ^ "IBNS officers". Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  11. ^ "Annual meetings". Homepage. International Behavioral Neuroscience Society. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  12. ^ McGregor IS, Adamec R, Canteras NS, Blanchard RJ, Blanchard DC (2005). "Defensive behavior". Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 29 (8): 1121–2. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2005.05.004. PMID 16102827. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  13. ^ Blanchard DC, Blanchard RJ, Rosen J (September 2008). "Olfaction and defense". Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 32 (7): 1207–8. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2008.07.003. PMID 18674558. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  14. ^ Brudzynski SM (September 2007). "Recent studies of mammalian vocalization". Behavioural Brain Research 182 (2): 152–4. doi:10.1016/j.bbr.2007.05.018. PMID 17619059. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 

External links[edit]