International Catalogue of Scientific Papers

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International Catalogue of Scientific Papers  
Discipline Science
Publication details
Publisher
Publication history
1901-1915

The International Catalogue of Scientific Papers was a bibliographic index of scientific literature that was published from 1901-1915, producing a total of 250 volumes.[1]

History[edit]

In 1865 the Smithsonian Institution began a catalog of scientific papers that developed into the International Catalogue of Scientific Papers in 1901.[1][2][3] The growing international tension that would lead to World War I led to the suspension of the publication of the International Catalogue of Scientific Papers.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Adkinson, B. W. (1976). "Federal government’s support of information activities: A historical sketch". Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science 2 (8): 24–26. "In 1865 the Smithsonian Institution initiated a project to compile and publish a catalog of current scientific papers which grew into an international cooperative project that issued 250 volumes of the International Catalogue of Scientific Papers between 1901 and 1915." 
  2. ^ Wooster, Harold (September 1987). "Historical Note: Shining Palaces, Shifting Sands: National Information Systems". Journal of the American Society for Information Science 38 (5): 321–335. doi:10.1002/(sici)1097-4571(198709)38:5<321::aid-asi2>3.0.co;2-t. "Smithsonian Institution began publication of general catalog of scientific papers; this program was later incorporated into the International Catalogue of Scientific Papers that was issued in 250 volumes between 1901 and 1915." 
  3. ^ "The International Catalogue of Scientific Papers". Nature 52 (1342): 270–271. 18 July 1895. doi:10.1038/052270a0. Retrieved 24 May 2012. 
  4. ^ MacLeod, Roy (September 1993). "The Chemists go to War: The Mobilization of Civilian Chemists and the British War Effort, 1914-1918.". Annals of Science 50 (5): 455–481. doi:10.1080/00033799300200341. "By December, the 'war of illusion' was over. As opposing trenches drew a line from Switzerland to the Channel, international science, as the New Statesman put it, was 'wrecked'. The international catalogue of scientific papers was suspended, and routine exchanges of data, weather maps, publications and reports all came to an abrupt end. 'Scientific objectivity' evaporated before jingoistic sentiments to which Lockyer lent the pages of Nature, and Crookes, those of Chemical News."