International Federation of Muaythai Amateur

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International Federation of Muaythai Amateur
International Federation of Muaythai Amateur.png
Official IFMA Logo
Abbreviation IFMA
Formation 1993
Legal status Federation
Headquarters Bangkok, Thailand
Region served Worldwide
Membership 128[1]
President Dr. Sakchye Tapsuwan
Website International Federation of Muaythai Amateur

The International Federation of Muaythai Amateur, or IFMA, is the sole sport governing body of amateur Muaythai consisting of 128 member countries worldwide with 5 continental federations. IFMA is officially recognised by SportAccord,[2] the Olympic Council of Asia,[3] WADA[4] IWGA, [5] and TAFISA.[6] Muaythai has been included in many official sport programs such as the Arafura Games, TAFISA Games, SEA Games, Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games, Asian Beach Games,[7] Demonstration Sport in the Asian Games, World Games and World Combat Games. IFMA is in partnership with Peace and Sport[8] and Generations For Peace,[9] which is under the Royal patronage of H.S.H. Albert II, Prince of Monaco. Muaythai also won the “Spirit of Sport Award” in 2014 given by SportAccord for using sport as a means to reach out and develop the local communities through the “Sport is Your Gang” campaign. Furthermore, IFMA also has begun a very beneficial campaign over a decade ago called The Muaythai Against Drugs (M.A.D.). This campaign helps putting education and sport together which are a tool to help disadvantaged children, who often live in environments with limited opportunities. IFMA and WMC have also signed a MoU with UN Women to partner with the United Nations Secretary-General’s UNiTE to End Violence Against Women campaign.

History[edit]

The International Federation of Muaythai Amateur (IFMA) started as a small federation with several enthusiastic countries more than two decades ago. It was officially inaugurated in 1993. After the passage of the first half of its life and at the dawn of an exciting new century, IFMA has grown to 128 member countries worldwide with 5 continental federations, all existing under a single, unified regulatory body. In 1998, IFMA was formally recognized by the Olympic Council of Asia. Muaythai through IFMA has come a long way from its first World Championships held in 1993 when a mere twenty-some countries participated. In the most recent World Championships the participation was overwhelming, with contestants and dignitaries attending from over one hundred countries. The highest milestone for IFMA came in 2006, when it was recognized by SportAccord (known at the time as the General Association of International Sports Federations, GAISF). Thus IFMA could proudly and officially come to the table with all other world-recognized international sports federations. Another exciting year for Muaythai was 2008, with the IFMA World Championships a part of The Association for International Sport for All’s (TAFISA) World Sport for All Games under the patronage of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). This raised the profile of Muaythai as an internationally recognized sport, through the activities of IFMA to promote Muaythai as a medium for cultural exchange and to raise awareness about this aspect of Thai tradition. 2010 marked the year when Muaythai was one of the 13 world recognized combat sport to be part of the World Combat Games in Beijing under patronage of the IOC, and the second edition was held in 2013 again under patronage of the IOC in St Petersburg, Russia. Now 15 world recognized Martial Arts including Olympic Fencing have also joined the games. IFMA’s objective is the total unification of all 128 member national federations, working mutually for the sport and the athletes. The enthusiasm and commitment of the members, boxers and officials is one of the greatest assets that IFMA brings to the ancient sport of Muaythai. [10]

Timeline[edit]

Some of the milestones which IFMA has achieved throughout the years:[11]

  • 1993 – Inauguration of IFMA
  • 1995 – First inclusion in the 18th Southeast Asian Games (SEA Games)
  • 1998 – Inclusion as a demonstration sport in the Asian Games
  • 1999 – Recognition from the Olympic Council of Asia
  • 2005 – Inclusion in the 23rd SEA Games as a fully recognised medal sport
  • 2005 – Inclusion in the Asian Indoor Games
  • 2006 – Recognition from the GAISF (SportAccord)
  • 2008 – Inclusion in the TAFISA Games and as a full member of the TAFISA Sport for All Organization
  • 2008 – Inclusion in the Arafura Games
  • 2010 – Participation at the 1st Edition of the SportAccord World Combat Games, Beijing, China
  • 2013 – Inclusion in the International World Games Association (IWGA)

Major Events for 2013[edit]

Notable upcoming events[edit]

IFMA World Championships[edit]

Since 1993 IFMA has held 15 World Championships. The number of countries involved has grown from around 20 at the first World Championships to over 100 (as of 2014). The location of the World Championships changes every year; past counties include: Thailand, Kazakhstan, Korea, Uzbekistan and Russia. The latest 2014 World Championships were held in Malaysia.

IOC Recognition[edit]

In April 2012, IFMA marked the official launch of the Muaythai towards IOC campaign at a special gala event in which IFMA lodged its Letter of intent to apply for International Olympic Committee (IOC) recognition to IOC Executive Board Member Dr CK Wu. At the same time, an application to be included in the 2017 World Games was handed to Mr. Ron Froehlich, President of the International World Games Association. Also, in attendance was Sport accord President Mr. Hein Verbruggen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ www.ifmamuaythai.org/about-ifma/
  2. ^ "SportAccord Members". Sportaccord.com. Retrieved 2013-01-25. 
  3. ^ "Olympic Council of Asia : Sports". Ocasia.org. Retrieved 2013-01-11. 
  4. ^ "List of IFs". wada-ama.org. Retrieved 2013-01-15. 
  5. ^ "Member federations International Muaythai Federation Amateur". theworldgames.org. Retrieved 2014-02-09. 
  6. ^ "Steckbrief - Tafisa Members - International". Tafisa.net. Retrieved 2013-01-11. 
  7. ^ "4th Asian Beach Game Phuket THAILAND". phuketthailand2014.com. Retrieved 2014-02-09. 
  8. ^ "International Federations". peace-sport.org. Retrieved 2013-01-15. 
  9. ^ http://www.generationsforpeace.org
  10. ^ http://www.ifmamuaythai.org/about-ifma/
  11. ^ http://www.ifmamuaythai.org/about-ifma/ifmas-past-timeline/

External links[edit]