International Prize for Arabic Fiction

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International Prize for Arabic Fiction
IPAF-color.jpg
Awarded for Best novel published in Arabic
Location Arab world
Presented by Emirates Foundation
First awarded 2008
Currently held by Mohammed Achaari and Raja Alem
Official website http://www.arabicfiction.org

The International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) is a literary prize managed in association with the Booker Prize Foundation in London, and supported by the Emirates Foundation in Abu Dhabi. The prize is specifically for prose fiction by Arabic authors, along the lines of the Man Booker Prize. Each year, the winner of the prize receives US$50,000 and the six shortlisted authors receive US$10,000 each.

The aim of the award is to recognise and reward excellence in contemporary Arabic fiction writing and to encourage wider readership of good-quality Arabic literature in the region and internationally. The prize is also designed to encourage the translation and promotion of Arabic language literature into other major world languages. An independent board of trustees, drawn from across the Arab world and beyond, is responsible for appointing six new judges each year, and for the overall management of the prize.

Rules and entry[edit]

Only novels are considered for the IPAF. Submissions are made by publishers, which can nominate up to three novels published in Arabic during the previous year. All authors must be living at the time of the award.[1]

Trustees[edit]

  • Ahdaf Soueif, Novelist and political and cultural commentator.
  • Professor Marie-Thérèse Abdel-Messih, Professor of English & Comparative Literature, University of Cairo, Egypt
  • Nouri Abid, Publisher, L'Edition Med Ali, Tunisia
  • Bachar Chebaro, Publisher, Scientific Arab Publishers, Lebanon
  • Dr. Peter Clark OBE, Independent Consultant and Writer, Middle East Cultural Advisory Services, UK
  • Professor Rasheed El-Enany, Professor of Modern Arabic Literature, University of Exeter, and Series Editor of Edinburgh Studies in Modern Arabic Literature, UK
  • Joumana Haddad, Writer, Poet and Journalist
  • Dr Khaled Hroub, Arab academic and director of Cambridge Arab Media Project (CAMP)
  • Assia Moussei, President and Publishing Manager of El Ikhtilef publishing house, translator and journalist, Algeria
  • Zaki Nusseibeh, Advisor, Ministry of Presidential Affairs – Vice-Chairman, Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage
  • Margaret Obank, Publisher and Editor, Banipal magazine of Modern Arab Literature, UK
  • William Sieghart, Chairman & Founder, Forward Publishing, National Poetry Day, UK
  • Professor Yasir Suleiman CBE, Professor of Arabic, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Evelyn (Eve) Smith, Company Secretary of International Prize for Arabic Fiction, Company Secretary Booker Prize Foundation, UK
  • Jonathan Taylor CBE, Current Chairman of the IPAF Board of Trustees. Chairman, Booker Prize Foundation, UK

Winners and nominees[edit]

Blue ribbon = winner

2008[edit]

The novels shortlisted for IPAF 2007–08:

2009[edit]

The shortlist was announced December 10, 2008 chosen from a total of 131 submissions from 16 Arabic countries. The winner was announced March 16, 2009.

Also longlisted in 2009[edit]

2010[edit]

The shortlist announced on December 16, 2009 was chosen from a total of 115 submissions from 17 Arabic countries. The winner was announced on March 2, 2010, the first day of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair.

Also longlisted in 2010[edit]

2011[edit]

Mohammed Achaari & Raja'a Alem, joint winners of the 2011 prize

The shortlist was announced December 9, 2010, chosen from a total of 123 submissions and a longlist of 16.[2] The winners were announced on March 14, 2011, the eve of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair. This marked the first time the award had been split, as well as the first female winner (Raja Alem).[3]

Also longlisted in 2011[edit]

2012[edit]

A total of 101 submissions from 15 countries were whittled down to a longlist of 13. This list was announced in November 2011. The final shortlist of six books was revealed on January 11, 2012. The winner was announced March 27, 2012.[4]

Also longlisted in 2012[edit]

2013[edit]

The longlist of 16 books was announced on December 6, 2012.[5] The shortlist of six books was announced on January 9, 2013.[6] The winner was announced on 23 April 2013.[7][8]

Also longlisted in 2013[edit]

2014[edit]

The longlist of 16 books was announced 7 January 2014.[9] The shortlist of 6 books was announced 10 February 2014.[10] The winner was announced 29 April 2014.[11][12][13]

Also longlisted in 2014[edit]

Judges[edit]

The judges since 2008 are listed below:

2008[edit]

2009[edit]

2010[edit]

2011[edit]

2012[edit]

2013[edit]

2014[edit]

Statistics[edit]

The following authors have been longlisted multiple times:

98 novels have been longlisted in the first seven years.

IPAF Nadwa[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rules and submissions for IPAF
  2. ^ 2011 Shortlist announced
  3. ^ The Guardian – 2011 winners
  4. ^ "The Druze of Belgrade by Rabee Jaber wins International Prize for Arabic Fiction 2012", IPAF website, March 27, 2012.
  5. ^ Joshua Farrington (6 December 2012). "International Prize for Arabic Fiction longlist". The Bookseller. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ Joshua Farrington (9 January 2013). "Shortlist for International Prize for Arabic Fiction". The Bookseller. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ M. Lynx Qualey (April 23, 2013). "Page-turning Novel by Young Kuwaiti Author Wins 2013 ‘Arabic Booker’". Arabic Literature (in English). Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  8. ^ Benedicte Page (24 April 2013). "Saud Alsanousi wins International Prize for Arabic Fiction". The Bookseller. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  9. ^ "2014 longlist". International Prize for Arabic Fiction. 7 January 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  10. ^ "No Title". International Prize for Arabic Fiction. 10 February 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ Randa El-Banna (April 30, 2014). "Saadawy wins International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014". The Cairo Post. Retrieved April 30, 2014. 
  12. ^ Dennis Abrams (April 30, 2014). ""Frankenstein in Baghdad" Wins the 2014 Arabic Booker Prize". Publishing Perspectives. Retrieved April 30, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Frankenstein in Baghdad by Ahmed Saadawi wins 2014 International Prize for Arabic Fiction". International Prize for Arabic Fiction. 29 April 2014. Retrieved April 30, 2014. 

External links[edit]