International Space University

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International Space University
ISU
Established 1987
Type Non-profit Interdisciplinary University
Chairman Chris Sallaberger
Chancellor Jean-Jacques Dordain
President Walter Peeters
Vice-president Angie Bukley, Steve Brody
Dean Angie Bukley
Director Chris Welch, David Kendall, John Connolly
Students 200/year
Location Illkirch-Graffenstaden near Strasbourg, Alsace, France
48°31′23″N 7°44′13″E / 48.5231°N 7.7369°E / 48.5231; 7.7369Coordinates: 48°31′23″N 7°44′13″E / 48.5231°N 7.7369°E / 48.5231; 7.7369
Website isunet.edu

The International Space University (ISU) was founded as an international institution of higher learning, dedicated to the development of outer space for peaceful purposes through international and multidisciplinary education and research programs (ISU Bylaws, Article 2.1). It is a not-for-profit interdisciplinary university founded in 1987 that offers a Master of Science in Space Studies (MSS) in addition to the flagship Space Studies Program (SSP), a professional development program that has convened annually every summer since 1988 at various locations around the world.[1]

The International Space University Central Campus and global headquarters are located in Illkirch-Graffenstaden near Strasbourg, France. ISU was founded on the "3-Is" philosophy providing an Interdisciplinary, Intercultural, and International environment for educating and training space professionals and post-graduate students. As of January 2014, there were over 3700 ISU alumni from more than 100 countries.

The ISU faculty members include astronauts, space agency leaders, space engineers, space scientists, managers, and experts in space law and policy comprising an international collection of experts in technical and non-technical space-related fields.

The Chancellor of the International Space University is Jean-Jacques Dordain, the Director General of the European Space Agency. Dordain succeeded the University's first Chancellor, Arthur C. Clarke, in 2004. The fifth President of the International Space University is Prof. Walter Peeters, who took office in September 2011.

History[edit]

In 1985, three young space enthusiasts created the Space Generation Foundation, dedicated to fostering a sense of identity for those people born since the beginning of the space era.[2] The ISU founders are Peter Diamandis, a medical doctor with a Master's in aerospace engineering from MIT; Todd Hawley, a graduate from Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, and Robert D. Richards, an engineer and physicist, and former assistant of the well-known astrophysicist Carl Sagan. They generated a series of novel ideas from which a ‘Space University’ was exceptionally well received.[3] The idea garnered the support of a number of important personalities in the space field, including Prof. U.R. Rao, president of the Indian Space Research Organization; Dr. Harrison Schmitt, an Apollo 17 astronaut and former senator; Dr. Gerard K. O'Neill from the Space Studies Institute; space pioneer Prof. Hermann Oberth; and Arthur C. Clarke, the visionary writer along with many others.[4]

This initiative was further developed and presented to the Advances in the Astronautical Sciences (AAS) Meeting dedicated to Aerospace Century XXI in Boulder, Colorado in 1986.[5] The following year, a three-day Founding Conference convened at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 10–12 April 1987. These dates were chosen to commemorate the flight of Yuri Gagarin (12 April 1961), the first human in space. The Founding Conference culminated in the formal creation of the International Space University, established as a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization in the state of Massachusetts, USA. The first ISU Summer Session Program (SSP) took place at MIT from 20 June to 20 August 1988 with the support of the major space agencies. The artwork for the first brochure was made by the well-known artist Pat Rawlings.

Following an international competition for a host city for the Central Campus, the ISU home base moved from Massachusetts to Illkirch-Graffenstaden in the Urban Community of Strasbourg, France in 1994. ISU is now a non-profit association registered in Alsace (France), and is still registered in the USA as a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization. The Governing Members of ISU are international organizations, industries, space agencies, academic institutions, and individual members.

The French Ministry of Education formally recognized ISU as an institute of higher education in 2004[6][full citation needed]. The International Space University has had permanent observer status with the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs since 1998. ISU was also granted full membership of the Space Agency Forum (SAF) in 1995. ISU is a member of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) and has been invited to contribute to a number of international activities including the Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum,[7][full citation needed] the IAF Symposium on “Bringing Space into Education”, the World Space Workshop on Education, and the National Science Week Steering Committee.[citation needed]

To ensure that the programs offered meet the demands of a rapidly changing space sector, ISU regularly conducts surveys to ascertain the latest educational needs of the global space enterprises and updates its programs accordingly. The milestones of the history of ISU are noted in the Table below:[citation needed]

Date Milestone
1987 ISU Founding Conference and Incorporation in USA
1988 First Summer Session at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts
1993 Strasbourg selected as Location for ISU Central Campus
1993 First Affiliate Conference, Huntsville, Alabama
1994 ISU relocates to Strasbourg and incorporates in Alsace
1995 First Master of Science in Space Studies (MSS)
1996 First Short Programs (Symposium, Workshops and PDP)
2000 Groundbreaking for ISU Central Campus in Illkirch-Graffenstaden
2002 Official Opening of ISU Central Campus
2003 First Introductory Space Course (now the Executive Space Course)
2004 Official Recognition by the French Ministry of Education
2004 First Master of Science in Space Management (MSM)
2009 Beginning of the Space Executive MBA (EMBA)
2011 Beginning of the Southern Hemisphere Summer Space Program (SHS-SP)
2012 25th Anniversary of ISU celebrated on 12 April
2014 20th Anniversary of ISU in Strasbourg

Campus[edit]

ISU was originally created in a geographically decentralized way, with summer sessions convened in a different country each year. In 1994 the Central Campus was established in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, because of its central European location and unique character. During the first years, the Master of Science classes were held in the Pôle API of the École Nationale Supérieure de Physique de Strasbourg.

Since 2002, ISU has had its own building thanks to the support of the local authorities. The Central Campus is now located in the Parc d’Innovation of Illkirch-Graffenstaden just south of Strasbourg, less than 30 minutes from the city center by public transportation.[8]

Organization and Administration[edit]

ISU's organizational structure includes a Board of Advisors, chaired by the Chancellor, and a Board of Trustees elected by the Governing Membership of the ISU. The Board of Trustees determines ISU's overall objectives, oversees the University's affairs and appoints the ISU President. The President is supported by an Executive Committee, Academic Staff (who prepare and deliver ISU programs) and Administrative Staff (responsible for the daily operation of the Institution). The Academic Staff are led by the Dean, who is supported by staff responsible for ISU's academic programs (Masters and SSP) and library services. The Academic Council of ISU is responsible for ensuring the academic quality of ISU's teaching and research activities. ISU academic staff include a number of Resident Faculty, augmented by other Faculty and Lecturers as needed for the programs.[citation needed]

Academics[edit]

The programs offered by ISU are dedicated to the future career development of graduate students and professionals from all nations seeking advancement in space-related fields. Tailored to the needs of postgraduates and professionals in the space sector or those who wish to work in this arena, ISU offers two kinds of programs:[citation needed]

Programs delivered each year on a regular basis[edit]

  • A twelve-month Master of Science in Space Studies (MSS)
  • A nine-week Space Studies Program (SSP)
  • A five-week Southern Hemisphere Summer Space Studies Program (SHSSP)
  • A one-week Executive Space Course (ESC) providing a basic introduction to space topics for corporates executives.

Short programs delivered on demand[edit]

  • Professional Development Programs
  • Workshops
  • Short Courses
  • Forums

Participation in these programs is open to individuals and institutions of all nationalities. As an open academic forum, ISU welcomes open and free discussions within its network respecting its Code of Conduct and Ethics.

Masters of Science[edit]

The Master of Science in Space Studies (MSS) and the Master of Science in Space Management (MSM) are graduate-level degree programs designed for individuals seeking professional development or further academic study in the space field. These one-year degree programs include a three-month professional internship and several professional visits. The main elements of the Masters are:[9]

  • Lectures covering all major disciplines related to space, with corresponding workshops and roundtables,
  • Lectures on contemporary space-related issues and events which as a whole provide an interdisciplinary and intercultural education,
  • Team Projects involving most, if not all, of those disciplines (see Table below),
  • Individual Projects performed during the academic year and during an internship period,
  • Professional Visits and participation to ISU Annual Symposium,
  • Specific skills training.
Year Team Projects
2013–2014
  • Team Projects on Space & Migration and One-Way Missions to Mars are in progress.
2012–2013
  • BRIAN: BRain for an Integrated Arctic Network[10]
  • Mars-X: Human Exploration of Mars from Martian Orbit[11]
2011–2012
  • IDEAS for Africa: Identifying and Developing Effective Applications of Space for Africa[12]
  • EC2LIPSE: Exploring Climate Change Lagrangian Point 1 Solutions for Earth[13]
2010–2011
  • KOUROU Vision 2030: Human Spaceflights from the Kourou Spaceport[14]
  • SHINE: Space for a Health Information Network on Earth[15]
2009–2010
  • MAP: Mars Analog Path[16]
  • CATCH: A space-based solution for illegal, unreported, unregulated fishing[17]
2008–2009
  • Climate LINKS: A terrestrial data collection network complementing satellite observations[18]
  • Space and Responsive Systems[19]
2007–2008
  • ALERTS: Analysis of Lunar Exploratory Robotic Tasks for Safety[20]
  • Great Expectations: Assessing the potential for suborbital transportation[21]
2006–2007
  • Full Moon: Storage & delivery of oxygen and hydrogen[22]
  • START: Space Tools supporting Archaeological Research and Tasks[23]
2005–2006
  • SWORD: Space Weather Observation, Research and Distribution[24]
  • FERTILE Moon: Feasibility of Extraction of Resources and Toolkit for in-situ Lunar Exploration[25]
2004–2005
  • Visysphere Mars: Terraforming meets engineered life adaptation[26]
  • SAOTEC: Space Aid for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion[27]
2003–2004
  • Human Missions to Europa and Titan – Why not?[28]
  • SPIN: Space-based Progressive Interoperable Networks[29]
2002–2003
  • PATH – M: Program Advancing Towards Humans on Mars[30]
  • Navigation Systems for Future Space Vehicles: Requirements and recommendations[31]
2001–2002
  • Virtual EVA: A ground option for space tourism[32]
  • Charting Response Options for Threatening Near Earth Object[33]
2000–2001
  • ISIS: ISU Small Satellite Interdisciplinary Survey[34]
  • PISCES: Proposal for International Spacecraft Cooperation for Education and Science[35]
1999–2000
  • ALTV: Autonomous Lunar Transport Vehicle[36]
1998–1999
  • Open for Business: A new approach to commercialization of the ISS[37]
1997–1998
  • THIRD EYE: An aircraft collision prevention teleservice[38]
1996–1997
  • MISSION: Multi-mission Innovative Space System for an Information Optimized Network[39]
1995–1996
  • SAND: Space Assisted Network against Desertification[40]

Space Studies Program[edit]

The Space Studies Program (SSP) is an intense nine-week course for postgraduate students and professionals of all disciplines. The curriculum covers the principal space related fields, both non-technical and technical and ranges from policy and law, business and management and humanities to life sciences, engineering, physical sciences and space applications. The shared experience of an international, interactive working environment is an ideal networking forum leading to the creation of an extensive, international, multidisciplinary professional network.

Each year the SSP convenes in a different location around the world. Moving to a new city and country adds an exciting dynamic as well as new resources and expertise to the program. The SSP curriculum includes:

  • Core Lectures covering fundamental concepts across all relevant disciplines,
  • Theme days presenting keys/issues of space with an interdisciplinary approach,
  • Hands-on workshops providing practical applications of the concepts presented in the lectures,
  • Departmental Activities of the seven SSP departments providing in-depth lectures & workshops, professional visits, and individual research projects,
  • Team Projects in which the SSP participants address a relevant space topic as an international, interdisciplinary, and intercultural team.

Future Space Studies Programs Future Space Studies programs are planned for:[41]

Past Space Studies Programs, Locations and Team Projects

Year Location Team Projects
2013 Strasbourg, France
  • SolarMAX: A space weather survival guide[42]
  • KOASTAL: Kenyan coast Observation through Affordable Space Technology Applications[43]
  • AMBIEnT: Affordable Microsatellite-based Internet access and EnvironmenTal monitoring[44]
2012 Florida Institute of Technology and NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA
  • BLISS: Beyond LEO Into the Solar System. A guide to future space stations[45]
  • OASIS: Operations And Service Infrastructure for Space[46]
  • Space Debris[47]
  • Space and STEM: One giant leap for education[48]
2011 Graz, Austria
  • CHARM: Cooperation of Humans and Robots for Mars[49]
  • GO SSP: Guidebook On Small Satellite Programs[50]
  • H2OPE: Tigris-Euphrates and the Global Water Crisis[51]
2010 Strasbourg, France
  • ecoSpace: Initiatives for Environmentally Sustainable Launch Activities[52]
  • ASTRA: Asteroid Mining[53]
  • RE-FOCUS: Carbon Cycle[54]
2009 NASA Ames Research Center, United States
  • ACCESS Mars: Assessing Cave Capabilities Establishing Specific Solutions[55]
  • SAFEN EARTH: Space Aid for Energy Needs on Earth[56]
  • DREAM: Disaster Risk Evaluation And Management[57]
2008 Barcelona, Spain
  • FuturIST: Future Infrastructure for Space Transportation[58]
  • VAPOR: An Integrated Framework for Early Warning and Hazard Tracking of Volcanic Activity on Earth[59]
  • Noumenia: Building on the Google Lunar X-Prize[60]
2007 Beijing, China
  • Space Traffic Management: Manage Spacecrafts and Debris in Space[61]
  • DOCTOR: Developing On-Orbit Servicing Concepts Technology Options and Roadmap[62]
  • Phoenix: Lunar Biological and Historical Archive[63]
  • TREMOR: Technology Resources for Earthquake Monitoring and Response[64]
2006 Strasbourg, France
  • Luna Gaia: A Closed Loop Habitat for the Moon[65]
  • MiNI: From Tiny to Infinity[66]
  • SOL: Earth Observation Systems for Small Countries and Regions[67]
2005 Vancouver, Canada
  • FLAMA: Fire Logistics And Management Approach[68]
  • CASSANDRA: A Strategy to Protect our Planet from Near-Earth Objects[69]
  • REVOLUTION: Robotic Exploration of Venus to Study Planetary Evolution[70]
2004 Adelaide, Australia
  • CONNECTS: The Role of Satellite Communications in the Development of Rural and Remote Regions[71]
  • STREAM: Space Technologies for the Research of Effective wAter Management[72]
  • LunAres: International Lunar Exploration in Preparation for Mars[73]
2003 Strasbourg, France
  • ECOSPHERE: Earth Climate Observation System Promoting Human Ecological Research & Education[74]
  • TRACKS TO SPACE: Technology Research Advancing Cooperative Knowledge Sharing to Space[75]
  • METZTLI: An International Space Station Approach to Lunar Exploration[76]
2002 Pomona, United States
  • Alone?: A Source Book for Astrobiology[77]
  • HI-STAR: Health Improvement using Space Technology and Resources[78]
2001 Bremen, Germany
  • C.A.S.H. 2021: Commercial Access and Space Habitation[79]
  • CASSIOPEE: Concepts for Advanced Small Satellites to Improve Observation and Preservation of Europe[80]
2000 Valparaíso, Chile
  • ENSO: A Global Challenge and Keys to a Solution[81]
  • Space Tourism: From Dream to Reality[82]
1999 Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
  • Out of the Cradle: An International Strategy for Human Exploration away from Earth[83]
  • SEADS: South East Asia Disaster Management System[84]
1998 Cleveland, United States
  • MAGIC: Moving Aside Gravity's Influence and Constraints[85]
  • Hazards to Spaceflight[86]
1997 Houston, United States
  • International Strategies for the Exploration of Mars[87]
  • Technology Transfer: Bridging Space and Society[88]
1996 Vienna, Austria
  • Ra: The Sun For Science And Humanity[89]
  • DOCC: Distant Operational Care Centre[90]
1995 Stockholm, Sweden
  • Earth's Polar Regions: Observation, Protection, and Applications[91]
  • Vision 2020: An International View of the Future[92]
1994 Barcelona, Spain
  • GATES: Global Access Tele-Health and Education System[93]
  • SSE: Solar System Exploration[94]
1993 Huntsville, United States
  • GEOWARN: Global Emergency Observation and Warning[95]
  • ILFOSS: International Lunar Farside Observatory & Science Station[96]
1992 Kitakyushu, Japan
  • ISUNET[97]
  • SSPP: Space Solar Power Program[98]
1991 Toulouse, France
  • International Mars Mission[99]
1990 Toronto, Canada
  • IAM: International Asteroid Mission[100]
  • International Program for Earth Observations[101]
1989 Strasbourg, France
  • Artemis: A Program to Identify and Map Lunar Resources[102]
  • Newton: A Variable Gravity Research Facility[103]
1988 Cambridge, United States
  • International Lunar Initiative Organization[104]

Southern Hemisphere Summer Space Program[edit]

The Southern Hemisphere Summer Space Program (SHS/SP) is a five weeks course open to undergraduate students and professionals of all disciplines with space interest. As in all ISU programs, the curriculum covers not only the space related fields and space applications, but also non-technical fields such as policy, law, space business and management techniques. The acquired experience is summarized in a jointly authored White Paper at the end of the session.

The intention of a second program, next to the established SSP program of ISU, was to extend the offering to participants of the Southern Hemisphere, in line with the local summer holidays, but participants from all nations are welcomed.

The program is offered in partnership with the University of South Australia in Adelaide (Mawson Lakes Campus) and benefits from scholarship support from the Australian Space Research Program. The intention is to have the program iterating to different locations in the Southern Hemisphere, in particular in Africa and South America, but regularly returning to Australia.

Year Location Whitepaper Topic
2014 UniSA, Australia
  • Our Turbulent Sun
2013 UniSA, Australia
  • Common Horizons
2012 UniSA, Australia
  • Space-Based Tele-Reach Systems for Southern Hemisphere
2011 UniSA, Australia
  • Paths to Progress: Space and the Southern Hemisphere

Previous White Paper executive summaries and full reports are available for download from the ISU Library.

Executive Space Course[edit]

The Executive Space Course (ESC) provides an overview of space and of space-related subjects for professionals of diverse backgrounds, including marketing, finance, law, and contracts management. Providing them with a better understanding of space technology and business, professionals leave with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to communicate more effectively with their technical colleagues. The course also provides its participants with exposure to a unique interdisciplinary, international and intercultural learning environment.

Academic Facilities[edit]

Library[edit]

Since 1995, the collection of the ISU Library has grown to reach about 9,000 space-related documents. The collection supports the interdisciplinary aspects of the courses and include subjects like space-related business and management, space policy and law, international cooperation, remote sensing and Earth observation, telecommunication, space engineering, space mission design, astronomy, space life sciences, and space medicine.The Library also features news about space, information from space agencies and research institutes around the world, and awareness and alerting services from journals. RSS feeds can be used to follow the library new acquisitions. Interested people may subscribe to the feeds for receiving regular updates about books, electronic documents, or Team Projects reports that are added to the online catalog.[105]

Training Facilities[edit]

With the strong support from ESA, the following facilities were installed and put into operation:[citation needed]

Astronomy Observatory[edit]

Several optical and radio telescopes at ISU give students the opportunity of performing observations as well as the necessary analysis, which introduces them to typical techniques of astrophysical research and gives them a first-hand experience in the study of the invisible Universe.

ESA-Dresden Radio Telescope[edit]

The satellite television Ku band (10–12 GHz) is suitable to perform observations of the Sun and the Moon, using conventional material, such as a 1.2-meter parabolic dish, placed on the roof of the ISU building. This telescope, developed under ESA contract by the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits in Dresden for use in schools, has been given to ISU by ESA. It is capable of providing properly calibrated data, and hence allows to determine the surface temperatures of the Sun and the Moon. Since its in-depth testing by ISU Masters students, it has been extensively used in the framework of workshops and individual student projects. With the ESA-Dresden Radio Telescope the students can experience and perform all the necessary steps from observation, calibration, and data reduction to the interpretation and evaluation of the results.

ESA-Haystack Radio Telescope[edit]

The Haystack Observatory, run by MIT, developed a Small Radio Telescope (SRT) for educational purposes, consisting of a 2.3-meter diameter standard satellite dish antenna. This radio telescope operates at a 1.42 GHz frequency (21-cm wavelength) where hydrogen atoms emit a strong spectral line. This allows radio astronomers to detect hydrogen, the most abundant element of the Universe. One SRT has been donated to ISU by ESA and is operational since 2009. This new asset, named the ESA-Haystack Radio Telescope, provides the students with the opportunity of performing observations of astronomical objects even outside the Solar System.

Concurrent Design Facility (CDF)[edit]

When the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) acquired a new Concurrent Design Facility, its initial CDF was set up at the ISU Central Campus in 2008. The CDF brings the Masters students the possibility of familiarizing with concurrent engineering and its application processes through workshops and assignments. These hands-on activities always have double-oriented tasks, by combining the CDF process with the development of space-related topics. As the usefulness of concurrent engineering extends much further than space mission design, the use of the ISU CDF for design processes in other industry fields than space is also under consideration.

GENSO Tracking Ground Station[edit]

A fully automated satellite tracking station is installed at ISU since 2008. This ground station provides several hands-on training opportunities for the Masters students, as satellite communication is now a reality at ISU. The ISU Tracking Ground Station was built in the scope of the Global Educational Network for Satellite Operations (GENSO) project, an endeavor involving students worldwide and promoted by the International Space Education Board (ISEB), an organization including the educational departments of some of the major space agencies worldwide.

Human Performance in Space Laboratory[edit]

Established in 2009, the ISU Human Spaceflight Laboratory includes a rotating chair, the training model of the ultrasound echocardiograph and body motion analysis equipment that flew on Mir in 1988, and the flight model of the neuroscience Pocket equipment that flew on the Space Shuttle STS-51G mission. This equipment was all donated by CNES. In addition, NASA has loaned a training model of the ISS Advanced Life Support Pack (ALSP) and ESA has loaned a training model of the ISS 3DSPACE experiment. The Human Spaceflight Laboratory is also equipped with a clinostat, an autoclave, a laminar flow cabinet, microscopes, medical diagnosis and surgery tools, and other laboratory equipment to provide realistic hands-on training on the experiments performed in space by astronauts.

Annual Symposium[edit]

Poster of the 17th ISU Annual International Symposium "Space Technology and Tele-Reach: Benefiting Humanity on Earth and Beyond", Strasbourg, France, 5–7 March 2013 http://www.isunet.edu/index.php/symposium

Up until 2013, an annual ISU symposium was convened to address a topic with broad interest both with space industry and among the space agencies. The Symposium has been suspended until further notice. Other international conference style events are being planned and convened on the ISU campus. Refer to the ISU web site fro more details. The following table presents the topics covered from 1996-2013.

Year Subject
2013 Space Technology and Tele-Reach: Benefiting Humanity on Earth and Beyond
2012 Sustainability of Space Activities: International Issues and Potential Solutions
2011 The International Space Station: Maximizing the Return from Extended Operations
2010 The Public Face of Space
2009 Space for a Safe and Secure World
2008 Space Solutions to Earth’s Global Challenges
2007 Why the Moon?
2006
2005 Space Exploration: Who, What, When, Where, Why?
2004 Civil, Commercial and Security Space: What Will Drive the Next Decade?
2003

Satellite Navigation Systems: Policy, Commercial and Technical Interaction[106]

2002

Beyond the International Space Station: The Future of Human Spaceflight[107]

2001

Smaller Satellites: Bigger Business? Concepts, Applications and Markets for Micro/Nanosatellites in a New Information World[108]

2000

The Space Transportation Market: Evolution or Revolution?[109]

1999

International Space Station: The Next Space Marketplace[110]

1998

Space and the Global Village: Tele-services for the 21st Century[111]

1997

New Space Markets[112]

1996

Space of Service to Humanity: Preserving Earth and Improving Life[113]

ISU People[edit]

Founders[edit]

Chancellors[edit]

Presidents[edit]

  • 1991–1994: George Van Reeth[citation needed]
  • 1994–1998: Roland Doré
  • 1998–2004: Karl Doetsch
  • 2004–2011: Michael Simpson
  • 2011–present: Walter Peeters[citation needed]

Faculty[edit]

  • College of Teachers
  • Guest and Visiting Lecturers

Board and Executive Staff[edit]

  • Walter Peeters, President
  • Angie Bukley, Dean & Vice President for Academic Affairs[citation needed]
  • Steve Brody, Vice President for North American Operations[citation needed]
  • ISU Board of Trustees
  • ISU Board of Advisors
  • ISU Academic Council

Astronauts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elaerts R, Peeters W (2006) The International Space University. ESA Bulletin 126: 34–40.
  2. ^ Hawley T (1986) Space Generation. Proceedings of the 37th International Astronautical Congress, Innsbruck, Austria, 4–11 October 1986, IAF-86-360
  3. ^ Peeters W (2006) The International Space University. In: Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy. Heck A (ed), Springer: Dordrecht, Vol. 7
  4. ^ McAleer N (1992) Arthur C. Clarke: The Authorized Biography. Contemporary Books: Chicago
  5. ^ Diamandis P, Sunshine K (1986) Creating an International Space University. Advances in Astronautical Sciences. Aerospace Century XXI, Space Missions and Policy, Vol 64, Part I, pp 533–540
  6. ^ decree MENS0400386A of 27 February 2004
  7. ^ APRSAF
  8. ^ "ISU Central Campus Location". Retrieved 27 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "Future SSPs". Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  10. ^ "BRIAN: BRain for an Integrated Arctic Network". International Space University. 2013. Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  11. ^ "Mars-X: Human Exploration of Mars from Martian Orbit". 2013. 
  12. ^ "IDEAS for Africa : identifying and developing effective applications of space for Africa". International Space University. 2012. Retrieved 28 October 2012. 
  13. ^ "EC2LIPSE : exploring climate change Lagrangian 1-point solutions for Earth". International Space University. 2012. Retrieved 28 October 2012. 
  14. ^ "KOUROU vision 2030". International Space University. 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  15. ^ "SHINE : Space for a Health Information Network on Earth". International Space University. 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "MAP : Mars Analog Path". International Space University. 2010. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  17. ^ "CATCH : a space-based solution for illegal, unreported, unregulated fishing". International Space University. 2010. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  18. ^ "Climate LINKS: A terrestrial data collection network complementing satellite observations". International Space University. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  19. ^ "Space and responsive systems". International Space University. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  20. ^ "ALERTS: Analysis of Lunar Exploratory Robotic Tasks for Safety". International Space University. 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  21. ^ "Great Expectations: Assessing the potential for suborbital transportation". International Space University. 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  22. ^ "Full Moon: Storage & delivery of oxygen and hydrogen". International Space University. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  23. ^ "START: Space Tools supporting Archaeological Research and Tasks". International Space University. 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  24. ^ "SWORD: Space Weather Observation, Research and Distribution". International Space University. 2006. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  25. ^ "FERTILE Moon: Feasibility of Extraction of Resources and Toolkit for in-situ Lunar Exploration". International Space University. 2006. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  26. ^ "Visysphere Mars: Terraforming meets engineered life adaptation". International Space University. 2005. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  27. ^ "SAOTEC: Space Aid for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion". International Space University. 2005. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  28. ^ "Human missions to Europa and Titan – Why not?". International Space University. 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  29. ^ "SPIN: Space-based Progressive Interoperable Networks". International Space University. 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  30. ^ "P.A.T.H. – M: Program Advancing Towards Humans on Mars". International Space University. 2003. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  31. ^ "Navigation systems for future space vehicles: Requirements and recommendations". International Space University. 2003. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  32. ^ "Virtual EVA: A ground option for space tourism". International Space University. 2002. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  33. ^ "Charting response options for threatening near earth object". International Space University. 2002. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  34. ^ "ISIS: ISU Small Satellite Interdisciplinary Survey". International Space University. 2001. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  35. ^ "PISCES: Proposal for International Spacecraft Cooperation for Education and Science". International Space University. 2001. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  36. ^ "ALTV: Autonomous Lunar Transport Vehicle". International Space University. 2000. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  37. ^ "Open for business: A new approach to commercialisation of the ISS". International Space University. 1999. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  38. ^ "THIRD EYE: An aircraft collision prevention tele-service". International Space University. 1998. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  39. ^ "MISSION: Multi-mission Innovative Space System for an Information Optimized Network". International Space University. 1997. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  40. ^ "SAND: Space Assisted Network against Desertification". International Space University. 1996. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  41. ^ "Future SSPs". Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  42. ^ "SolarMAX: A space weather survival guide". International Space University. 2013. Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
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