International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians

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The Logo of the International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians

The International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians is the junior section of the prestigious International Tchaikovsky Competition. The competition is open to musicians under the age 17 in the area of piano, violin, and cello. The first, second, and third prize winners receive special recommendation from the Association of Tchaikovsky Competition Stars to advance to the senior section without the preliminary procedure.

The competition takes place in different countries each time, maximizing the opportunity to participate in the competition for talented young musicians of various geographic areas.

Previous competitions:

  1. Moscow, Russia (1992);
  2. Sendai, Japan (1995);
  3. St. Petersburg, Russia (1997);
  4. Xiamen, China (2002);
  5. Kurashiki, Japan (2004);
  6. Suwon, Korea (2009);
  7. Montreux-Vevey, Switzerland (2012);
  8. Moscow, Russia (2014).

The competition proves to be an opportunity for young musicians to be exposed to sophisticated audiences, reputable musicians of the jury panel, and other young fellow musicians from around the world. On top of the monetary awards, the laureates are engaged in concert tours arranged by the organizing committee at the conclusion of the competition.

First prize winners[edit]

Piano

  • 1992: Alexander Mogilevsky (Russia), Emily Shea (USA)
  • 1995: Lang Lang (China)
  • 1997: Sergey Bassukinsky (Russia)
  • 2002: Haochen Zhang (China)
  • 2004: Yulia Chaplina (Russia)
  • 2009: Nansung Huang (China)
  • 2012: Alexander Kutuzov (Russia)
  • 2014: Aleksandr Malafeev (Russia)

Violin

  • 1995: Piotr Kwasny (Poland)
  • 1997: Bui Cong Duy (Vietnam)
  • 2002: Xiao-yu Yang (China)
  • 2004: Aylen Pritchin (Russia)
  • 2009: Sirena Huang (USA)
  • 2012: Veriko Tchumburidze (Turkey-Georgia)
  • 2014: Ruslan Turuntaev (Kazakhstan)

Cello

  • 1992: Daniel Müller-Schott (Germany)
  • 1995: Monika Leskovar (Croatia)
  • 1997: Bong Ihn Koh (South Korea)
  • 2002: Bonian Tian (China)
  • 2004: Fedor Amosov (Russia)
  • 2009: Michiaki Ueno (Japan)
  • 2012: Noah Lee (USA)
  • 2014: La Li (China)

External links[edit]