International business

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International Business comprises all commercial transactions (private and governmental, sales, investments, logistics, and transportation) that take place between two or more regions, countries and nations beyond their political boundaries. Usually, private companies undertake such transactions for profit; governments undertake them for profit and for political reasons.[1] It refers to all those business activities which involve cross border transactions of goods, services, resources between two or more nations. Transaction of economic resources include capital, skills, people etc. for international production of physical goods and services such as finance, banking, insurance, construction etc.[2]

A multinational enterprise (MNE) is a company that has a worldwide approach to markets and production or one with operations in more than a country. An MNE is often called multinational corporation (MNC) or transnational company (TNC). Well known MNCs include fast food companies such as McDonald's and Yum Brands, vehicle manufacturers such as General Motors, Ford Motor Company and Toyota, consumer electronics companies like Samsung, LG and Sony, and energy companies such as ExxonMobil, Shell and BP. Most of the largest corporations operate in multiple national markets.

Areas of study within this topic include differences in legal systems, political systems, economic policy, language, accounting standards, labor standards, living standards, environmental standards, local culture, corporate culture, foreign exchange market, tariffs, import and export regulations, trade agreements, climate, education and many more topics. Each of these factors requires significant changes in how individual business units operate from one country to the next.

Physical and societal factors of competitive Business and social environment[edit]

The conduct of international operations depends on companies' objectives and the means with which they carry them out. The operations affect and are affected by the physical and societal factors and the competitive environment.

A===Operations of Business===

Choice of Entry Mode[edit]

Strategic variables impact the choice of entry mode for multinational corporation expansion beyond their domestic markets. These variables are global concentration, global synergies, and global strategic motivations of MNC.

  • Global concentration: many MNC share and overlap markets with a limited number of other corporations in the same industry.
  • Global synergies: the reuse or sharing of resources by a corporation and may include marketing departments or other inputs that can be used in multiple markets.
  • Global strategic motivations: other factors beyond entry mode that are the basic reasons for corporate expansion into an additional market. These are strategic reasons that may include establishing a foreign outpost for expansion, developing sourcing sites among other strategic reasons.[3]

Means of Businesses[edit]

Physical and social factors of business[edit]

Competitive factors of business[edit]

Economical factor Social factor

Risk of Business[edit]

  • Strategic
  • Operational risk
  • Political risk
  • Technological Risk
  • Environmental Risk
  • Economic Risk
  • Financial risk
  • Terrorism Risk
  • Planning risk
  • Price risk
  • Customer satisfaction risk
  • Mismanagement risks
  • Competitive risks

Factors that influenced the growth in globalization of international business[edit]

There has been growth in globalization in recent decades due to (at least) the following eight factors:

Importance of International Business Education[edit]

  • Most companies are either international or compete with international companies.
  • Modes of operation may differ from those used domestically.
  • The best way of conducting business may differ by country.
  • An understanding helps you make better career decisions.
  • An understanding helps you decide what governmental policies to support.

Managers in international business must understand social science disciplines and how they affect all functional business fields.

Importance of language/cultural studies in International Business[edit]

A considerable advantage in International Business is gained through the knowledge and use of language. Advantages of being a International Businessperson who is fluent in the local language include the following:

  • Having the ability to directly communicate with employees and customers
  • Understanding the manner of speaking within business in the local area to improve overall productivity
  • Gaining respect of customers and employees from speaking with them in their native tongue


In many cases it is truly impossible to gain an understanding of a culture's buying habits without first taking the time to understand the culture. Examples of the benefit of understanding local culture include the following:

  • Being able to provide marketing techniques that are specifically tailored to the local market
  • Knowing how other businesses operate in the and what might or might not be social taboos
  • Understanding the time structure of an area. Some societies are more focused on "being on time" while others focus on doing business at "the right time"
  • Associate with other people whom do not know several languages.

Importance of studying International Business[edit]

The International Business standards focuses on the following:

  • raising awareness of the interrelatedness of one country's political policies and economic practices on another;
  • learning to improve international business relations through appropriate communication strategies;
  • understanding the global business environment—that is, the interconnectedness of cultural, political, legal, economic, and ethical systems;
  • exploring basic concepts underlying international finance, management, marketing, and trade relations; and
  • identifying forms of business ownership and international business opportunities.

By focusing on these, students will gain a better understanding of Political economy. These are tools that would help future business people bridge the economical and political gap between countries.

There is an increasing amount of demand for business people with an education in International Business. A survey conducted by Thomas Patrick from University of Notre Dame concluded that Bachelor's degree holders and Master's degree holders felt that the training received through education were very practical in the working environment. Business people with an education in International Business also had a significantly higher chance of being sent abroad to work under the international operations of a firm.

The following table provides descriptions of higher education in International Business and its benefits.

Masters Doctorate
Who is this degree for People interested in management careers with multinational companies People who are interested in academic or research careers
Common Career Paths (with approximate median annual salary) - Chief executives ($167,000)*

- General or operations managers ($95,000)*

- University business professors ($75,000)*

- Economists ($91,000)*

Time to Completion 1–2 years full-time 3–5 years in addition to master's or other foundational coursework
Common Graduation Requirements - Roughly 15-20 graduate level courses

- Internship or study abroad program

- Foreign language requirement

Most (or all) of the master's degree requirements, plus:

- At least 12 more graduate level courses

- Ph.D. qualifier exams

- Dissertation prospectus (proposal)

- Dissertation

- Teaching requirement

Prerequisites Bachelor's degree and work experience, quantitative expertise Bachelor's or master's degree in business or related field
Online Availability Yes Limited

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Daniels, J., Radebaugh, L., Sullivan, D. (2007). International Business: environment and operations, 11th edition. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-186942-6
  2. ^ Joshi, Rakesh Mohan, (2009) International Business, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-568909-7
  3. ^ Kim, W. C., & Hwang, P. (1992). Global strategy and multinationals' entry mode choice. Journal of International Business Studies, 23(1), 29. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.proxy.davenport.edu/docview/197155299?accountid=40195
  4. ^ Luthans, F., Doh, J. P. (2015). International Management: Culture, Strategy and Behavior, 9th edition. McGraw Hill. ISBN 0-07786244-9

See also[edit]

External links[edit]