Internet Defense League

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The Internet Defense League
Internet Defense League logo - cat face.svg
Web address internetdefenseleague.org
Slogan Make sure the Internet never loses. Ever.
Commercial? No
Type of site
Political activism
Registration none
Available in English
Owner Fight For the Future
Launched 8 March 2012; 2 years ago (2012-03-08)
Alexa rank
250,583 (as of January 2013)[1]
Current status online

The Internet Defense League is a website that was launched in March 2012 with the aim of organizing future online protests of anti-piracy legislation, following the success of the anti-SOPA and PIPA protests.

History[edit]

The Internet Defense League site is a creation of the Fight for the Future nonprofit, a group noted for its participation in the anti-SOPA protests of 2011,[2] and Alexis Ohanian, founder of Reddit.[3]

Website[edit]

According to Tiffiniy Cheng, co-founder of Fight for the Future, the aim of the Defense League site is to sign up thousands of websites, from giant organizations to individual bloggers, who can be mobilized quickly if needed for future anti-piracy legislation protests. They will use a "cat signal", a takeoff on the Bat signal, if there is need to act. "There's this academic theory ... that talks about if you ban the ability of people to share cat photos, they'll start protesting en masse", Cheng explains to CNN as to why they chose a symbol of a cat.[4]

Reception[edit]

As of May 2012, several notable organizations have signed on to the protest network, including Mozilla, Reddit, WordPress, and the Cheezburger Network.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alexa ranking". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 4 July 2012. 
  2. ^ Netburn, Deborah (26 May 2012). "Internet Defense League introduces 'cat signal' for websites". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Greenberg, Andy (25 May 2012). "Reddit's Alexis Ohanian And Activists Aim To Build A 'Bat-Signal For The Internet'". Forbes. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Sutter, John D. (29 May 2012). "A 'bat signal' to defend the open Internet". CNN. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  5. ^ IDL website

External links[edit]