Internet Direct

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Internet Direct, also known as "Indy", is a free software / open source socket library written in Object Pascal, an object-oriented version of Pascal. It includes clients, servers, TCP, UDP, and raw sockets, as well as over 100 higher level protocols implementations such as SMTP, POP3, NNTP, and HTTP.[1] Indy includes support for OpenSSL[2] and Zlib in the protocol implementations.[3] Indy 10 was ported to Free Pascal, and runs on Windows, FreeBSD, Linux, and Darwin.[4]

Internet Direct is available for Borland Delphi, C++ Builder, and Kylix.[1] The software is dual-licensed under the "Indy Modified BSD License" and the "Indy MPL License".[5] As of early 2008, there is a new project called Indy#, which intends to write a C# version from the ground up.[6]

History[edit]

Indy was initially named "Winshoes" and was written by Chad Z. Hower (a.k.a. Kudzu[7]) in 1993 in Visual Basic.[8] In 1995, he ported it to Borland Delphi and deprecated the Visual Basic version. In 1997, he made it available under an open-source license.[5] In 2000, Winshoes was renamed to Internet Direct (Indy for short) and became cross-platform. In 2001, Borland began including it as a part of Borland Delphi, C++ Builder, and Kylix. In 2003, Indy was ported to Delphi for .NET. The following year, Indy was made available to the Microsoft .NET community.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Indy Project - What is Indy. Sockets?". Retrieved 2006-08-23. 
  2. ^ "Indy Knowledge Base". Retrieved 2006-08-23. 
  3. ^ Internet Direct (Indy) An Open Source suite of Internet components. (ZIP Compressed PDF). Chad Z. Hower (aka Kudzu) and the Indy Pit Crew. 2006-02-11. p. 365. Retrieved 2006-02-11. 
  4. ^ "Indy.Sockets - Indy 10 Lazarus/Free Pascal Port". Retrieved 2006-08-23. 
  5. ^ a b "Indy Project - License". Indy Project. Retrieved 2008-02-06. 
  6. ^ "Indy.Sockets". Retrieved 2006-08-24. 
  7. ^ Hower, Chad Z. "Kudzu World". 
  8. ^ a b "Indy Project - About". Indy Project. Retrieved 2008-02-06. 

External links[edit]