Interpenetrating polymer network

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An Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) is a polymer comprising two or more networks which are at least partially interlaced on a polymer scale but not covalently bonded to each other. The network cannot be separated unless chemical bonds are broken.[1] The two or more networks can be envisioned to be entangled in such a way that they are concatenated and cannot be pulled apart, but not bonded to each other by any chemical bond.

IUPAC definition

Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN): A polymer comprising two
or more networks which are at least partially interlaced on a molecular scale
but not covalently bonded to each other and cannot be separated unless chemical
bonds are broken.

Note: A mixture of two or more pre-formed polymer networks is not an IPN. [2]

Semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN): A polymer comprising one or
more networks and one or more linear or branched polymer(s) characterized by the
penetration on a molecular scale of at least one of the networks by at least some
of the linear or branched macromolecules.

Note: Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks are distinguished from
interpenetrating polymer networks because the constituent linear or branched
polymers can, in principle, be separated from the constituent polymer network(s)
without breaking chemical bonds; they are polymer blends. [3]

Sequential interpenetrating polymer network: Interpenetrating polymer network
prepared by a process in which the second component network is formed
following the formation of the first component network.[4]

Sequential semi-interpenetrating polymer network: Semi-interpenetrating
polymer network
prepared by a process in which the linear or branched
components are formed following the completion of the reactions that lead to
the formation of the network(s) or vice versa.[5]

Simply mixing two or more polymers does not create an interpenetrating polymer network (polymer blend), nor does creating a polymer network out of more than one kind of monomers which are bonded to each other to form one network (heteropolymer or copolymer).

There are semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN)[6] and pseudo-interpenetrating polymer networks.[7]

To prepare IPNs and SIPNs, the different components are formed simultaneously[8][9] or sequentially.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/I03117.html
  2. ^ "Glossary of basic terms in polymer science (IUPAC Recommendations 1996)". Pure and Applied Chemistry 68 (12): 2287–2311. 1996. doi:10.1351/pac199668122287. 
  3. ^ "Glossary of basic terms in polymer science (IUPAC Recommendations 1996)". Pure and Applied Chemistry 68 (12): 2287–2311. 1996. doi:10.1351/pac199668122287. 
  4. ^ "Definitions of terms relating to the structure and processing of sols, gels, networks, and inorganic–organic hybrid materials (IUPAC Recommendations 2007)". Pure and Applied Chemistry 79 (10). 2007. doi:10.1351/pac200779101801. 
  5. ^ "Definitions of terms relating to the structure and processing of sols, gels, networks, and inorganic–organic hybrid materials (IUPAC Recommendations 2007)". Pure and Applied Chemistry 79 (10). 2007. doi:10.1351/pac200779101801. 
  6. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/S05598.html
  7. ^ Sperling, L.H., J. Polymer Sci.: Macromolecular Reviews, Vol. 12, 141-180 (1977)
  8. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/ST07567.html
  9. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/ST07575.html
  10. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/ST07566.html
  11. ^ http://goldbook.iupac.org/ST07574.html