Business routes of Interstate 69 in Michigan

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Interstate 69 marker

Interstate 69
Highway system

There are currently four business routes of Interstate 69 (I-69) in the US state of Michigan. Designated Business Loop Interstate 69 (BL I-69), they are all former routings of I-69's predecessor highways, US Highway 27 (US 27), M-78 or M-21, in whole or in part. The BL I-69 in Coldwater and the one in Charlotte were both parts of US 27 before the freeway bypassed those two cities in 1967 and the early 1970s, respectively. The BL I-69 through Lansing and East Lansing was previously part of M-78 and Temporary I-69 until it was redesignated in 1987. Before 1984, the loop in Port Huron was originally part of M-21 and was initially a business spur numbered Business Spur Interstate 69 (BS I-69). It was later redesignated when it was extended to run concurrently with that city's BL I-94 which was originally part of I-94's predecessor, US 25. Each business loop follows streets through each city's downtown areas and connects to I-69 on both ends, giving traffic a route through the downtown and back to the freeway.

Coldwater[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 69
Location: Coldwater
Length: 5.202 mi[1] (8.372 km)
Existed: 1967[2]–present

Business Loop I-69 (BL I-69) is a business loop formed from part of the old US 27 and part of US 12 near and through Coldwater. At the southern end, it begins at exit 10 on I-69 where Fenn Road crosses the freeway. The business loop follows the two-lane Fenn Road west for about three-quarters of a mile (1.2 km), then curves north to merge with old US 27 (Angola Road). The highway runs northward through farmland south of Coldwater, and after approximately two miles (3.2 km), it enters the city limit at Garfield Road. Once in Coldwater, the business loop follows Clay Street through residential neighborhoods. After another half mile (0.8 km), the highway reaches a fork where Clay Street continues due north and Division Street branches to the northeast; BL I-69 follows the four-lane Division Street for about another mile (1.6 km) to the main intersection in the city known locally as "the Four Corners." This intersection is where old US 27 intersects US 12 (Chicago Street). BL I-69 turns eastward along the four-lane US 12 and continues from the Four Corners back to I-69 at exit 13.[3][4]

In 1919, the Michigan State Highway Department (MSHD)[a] signposted the highway system for the first time,[5] and the future US 27 corridor through Coldwater was part of the original M-29.[6] On November 11, 1926, the United States Numbered Highway System was approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO),[7][b] and the new US 27 replaced M-29 in the area.[8] In September 1967, the freeway bypassing Coldwater opened.[2] At the same time, the old route through the city was redesignated as BL I-69.[9][10]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Branch County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
OvidColdwater township line 0.000 0.000 I‑69 – Fort Wayne, Lansing Southern terminus at exit 10 on I-69
Coldwater 3.734 6.009 US 12 west – Niles Western end of US 12 concurrency
5.202 8.372 I‑69 – Fort Wayne, Lansing
US 12 east
Eastern end of US 12 concurrency; northern terminus at exit 13 on I-69
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Charlotte[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 69
Location: Charlotte
Length: 4.891 mi[1] (7.871 km)
Existed: 1974[11][12]–present

Business Loop I-69 (BL I-69) is a business loop that took over the Business US 27 (Bus. US 27) route inside Charlotte. It is a surface street for the nearly five miles (8.0 km) of the loop. The trunkline starts just outside of the city of Charlotte at exit 57 and follows Cochran Road The loop travels due north through rural areas south of town along a two-lane road. North of a crossing of the Battle Creek River, Cochrane Road widens to include a center turn lane. About 2 34 miles (4.4 km) north of the starting point, BL I-69 begins a 34-mile (1.2 km) concurrency with M-50 at Shepherd Street. North of Warren Avenue, BL I-69/M-50 widens to four lanes, two in each direction. The concurrency ends at Lawrence Avenue; M-50 continues north, and the business loop heads east on Lawrence Avenue for a few blocks. That intersection also marks the eastern terminus of M-79. From that point, BL I-69 follows Lawrence Avenue and then veers northeast onto Lansing Street to completes its loop at exit 61.[3][13]

In 1919, the MSHD[a] signposted the highway system for the first time,[5] and the future US 27 corridor through Charlotte was part of the original M-29.[6] On November 11, 1926, the United States Numbered Highway System was approved by the AASHO[7][b] and the new US 27 replaced M-29 through Coldwater.[8] By the end of the next year, M-78 was extended from downtown Charlotte along US 27 to run northeasterly toward Lansing.[14] The highway through downtown Charlotte was first designated Bus. US 27 after the 1961 completion of a non-freeway bypass, a two-lane highway with limited access on the east of the city. At that point I-69 only existed in the southern parts of Michigan.[15][16] That freeway was not extended up to the city when the southernmost segment of I-69 was completed in 1967.[9][10] By 1971, I-69 was completed to Charlotte and at the time US 27 was cosigned with I-69, the bypass being incorporated into I-69.[17][18] For three years the business loop in Charlotte was not signed as BL I-69, but it was so designated in 1974 and Bus. US 27 was decommissioned in and near Charlotte.[11][12]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Eaton County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
CarmelEaton township line 0.000 0.000 I‑69 – Fort Wayne, Lansing Southern terminus at exit 57 on I-69
Charlotte 2.806 4.516 M‑50 east (Shepherd Street) – Eaton Rapids Southern end of M-50 concurrency
3.528 5.678 M‑50 west (Cochran Avenue) – Grand Rapids
M‑79 west (Lawrence Avenue) – Hastings
Northern end of M-50 concurrency;
eastern terminus of M-79
4.891 7.871 I‑69 – Fort Wayne, Lansing Northern terminus at exit 61 on I-69
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Lansing[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 69
Location: LansingEast Lansing
Length: 14.591 mi[1] (23.482 km)
Existed: 1987[19][20]–present

Business Loop I-69, or BL I-69, is a business loop in the Lansing area. Beginning at exit 93 on I-96/I-69 in Eaton County west of the city, the business loop runs concurrently with M-43 east along Saginaw Highway. The roadway travels through commercial areas in Delta Township and past the Lansing Mall. BL I-69/M-43 continues east on Saginaw Highway and crosses into Ingham County at Waverly Road. From the county line eastward, the highway is known as Saginaw Street, and it passes through residential neighborhoods. Within the city of Lansing, BL I-69 utilizes a one-way pair of streets: Saginaw Street eastbound and Oakland Street westbound. One block separates the two directions of BL I-69/M-43 until the intersection with Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard near the St. Lawrence Campus of the Sparrow Hospital; east of this intersection two blocks separate the two directions of the highway. The business loop crosses the Grand River in downtown Lansing near the campus of Lansing Community College north of the Michigan State Capitol.[21][22]

On the eastern side of the river just north of Cooley Law School Stadium, BL I-69/M-43 intersects the one-way pair of Cedar and Larch streets that carries the two directions of BL I-96. BL I-69/M-43 continues through residential areas east of the other business loop. Near Marshall Park between Maryland Avenue and Marshall Street, Oakland Avenue ends and Grand River Avenue takes over for the westbound direction of BL I-69/M-43. Further east near the interchange with US 127, Grand River Avenue and Saginaw Street cross each other. M-43 departs to the southeast via Grand River Avenue while BL I-69 turns northeasterly via Saginaw Street. East of this intersection, BL I-69 crosses into East Lansing and runs through residential areas on the north side of the city. The roadway turns due east at Abbot Road. At an intersection with Haslett Road, Saginaw Street widens into a divided highway with a grassy median. Along this section, it resumes the Saginaw Highway name and turns northeasterly again, crossing into Meridian Township. The major intersections along Saginaw Highway have Michigan left turns as well. Before the business loop ends, it crosses into Clinton County. The eastern end of BL I-69 is located at exit 94 on I-69 in Bath Township.[21][22]

In 1919, the MSHD[a] signposted the highway system for the first time,[5] and the east–west highways through Lansing were part of the original M-29 through downtown and the original M-39 north of downtown. The north–south highway in Lansing was the original M-14.[6] On November 11, 1926, the United States Numbered Highway System was approved by the AASHO,[7][b] and the new US 27 replaced M-29 and M-14 in the area.[8] By the end of the next year, M-78 was extended from Charlotte along US 27 to through downtown Lansing. M-78 separated from US 27 in downtown Lansing and continued northeasterly through the northern part of East Lansing.[14] M-39 was replaced with an extended M-43 in 1938.[23][24] It is the longest business route in the state of Michigan at a length of over 14 12 miles (23.3 km).[1]

As the freeways in the Lansing area were completed in the 1960s through the 1980s, the highways through downtown changed designations. The section of I-96 west of Lansing opened in December 1962.[25] In 1973, M-78 was converted to a freeway near the Flint area, and from Olivet southwest of Lansing to the new freeway, the old highway was redesignated Temporary I-69.[26][27] Additional segments of I-69 north of Lansing were finished in 1984[28][29] and 1987. I-69 was routed over I-96 and the new freeway north of Lansing, and the business loop was designated along M-43 and the former Temp. I-69 in 1987 after that second segment opened.[19][20]

Major intersections

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Eaton Delta Township 0.000 0.000 I‑96 / I‑69 – Fort Wayne
M‑43 west – Hastings
Western end of M-43 concurrency; western terminus at exit 93 on I-96/I-69
Ingham Lansing 4.329 6.967 Oakland Avenue Western end of one-way pairing
6.402 10.303 BL I‑96 east (Cedar Street) Eastbound direction for BL I-96
6.497 10.456 BL I‑96 west (Larch Street) Westbound direction for BL I-96
Lansing Township 8.238–
8.256
13.258–
13.287
US 127 – Jackson, Clare Exit 78 on US 127
Lansing 8.449–
8.515
13.597–
13.704
M‑43 (Grand River Avenue) Eastern end of M-43 concurrency; eastern end of one-way pairing with Oakland and Grand River avenues
East Lansing 10.790 17.365 Western end of divided highway
Clinton Bath Township 14.147 22.767 Old M-78 Eastern end of divided highway; western end of freeway
14.591 23.482 I‑69 – Lansing, Flint Eastern terminus at exit 94 on I-69
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Port Huron[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 69
Location: Port Huron
Length: 3.077 mi[1] (4.952 km)
Existed: 1984[30][31]–present

Business Loop I-69 (BL I-69) is a business loop running through downtown Port Huron. The first mile or so (1.7 km) of BL I-69 runs southeasterly from I-69 at the interchange where it meets I-94. The business loop follows a four-lane freeway until the intersection with 32nd Street. A bit further east, it turns due east–west into a one-way pair of three-lane surface streets, eastbound along Oak Street and westbound along Griswold Street, that run through residential areas on the west and south sides of Port Huron. East of 23rd Street. the two halves of BL I-69 narrow to two lanes each. In downtown Port Huron, BL I-69 turns northerly running concurrently with BL I-94 on four-lane Military Avenue parallel to the St. Clair River. North of the crossing of the Black River, BL I-69/BL I-94 continues northward on Huron Avenue through downtown. At the intersection with Glenwood Avenue, the business loop turns northwesterly onto Pine Grove Avenue through residential areas on the north side of the city. The street is 5 lanes, two in each direction with a center turn lane, and passes under the I-94/I-69 freeway at the toll and customs plazas for the Blue Water Bridge; north of the freeway, there is a ramp to connect to the eastbound direction of the freeway and the bridge. The business loop continues along Pine Grove Avenue to Hancock Street where it turns westward for a block. Then it turns south along the connector to terminate at westbound I-94/I-69 west of the Blue Water Bridge toll plaza.[32][33]

In 1919, the MSHD[a] signposted the highway system for the first time,[5] and the east–west highway through Port Huron was part of the original M-19, and the north–south highway was part of the original M-27.[6] M-21 was extended over M-19 into Port Huron by 1924.[34] On November 11, 1926, the United States Numbered Highway System was approved by the AASHO,[7][b] and the new US 25 replaced M-27 in the area.[8] In 1964, a section of I-94 in the Port Huron area was completed. The former route of US 25 through downtown was redesignated Bus. US 25 when the main highway was shifted out to the freeway.[35][36] The first freeway segment of M-21 was built into the Port Huron area in 1966; the freeway directly tied into the western end of the old route into downtown.[37][38] In 1973, US 25 was decommissioned in the state, and the former Bus. US 25 was renumbered BL I-94.[39][40] The remaining segment of freeway along the M-21 corridor opened in 1984 as I-69; after this freeway opened, M-21 was shortened to Flint, and the former M-21 in Port Huron became Business Spur I-69.[30][31] To connect back to I-69, the business route was extended northward along BL I-94 when that highway was designated through downtown in 1986.[41][42]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in St. Clair County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Port Huron Township 0.000 0.000 I‑94 west / I‑69 west – Detroit, Flint Eastern terminus at exit 271 on I-94 and exit 198 on I-69; eastbound entrance and westbound exit
1.104 1.777 32nd Street Eastern end of freeway
1.207 1.942 Griswold Street Western end of one-way pairing
Port Huron 2.940 4.731 BL I‑94 west (Military Street) Southern end of BL I-94 concurrency
2.348 3.779 I‑94 east / I‑69 east – Blue Water Bridge Part of exit 275 on I-94/I-69
2.625 4.225 M‑25 north (Pine Grove Avenue) Southern terminus of M-25
3.077 4.952 I‑94 west / I‑69 west – Detroit, Flint
BL I‑94 south
Northern end of BL I-94 concurrency; western terminus at exit 275 on I-94/I-69
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d The Michigan State Highway Department was reorganized into the Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation on August 23, 1973. The name was shortened to its current form in 1978.[43]
  2. ^ a b c d AASHO was renamed the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) on November 13, 1973.[44]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Indiana, Mich., To Open Road". The News-Palladium (Benton Harbor, MI). Associated Press. September 29, 1967. p. 12. OCLC 10117334. Retrieved August 15, 2013 – via NewspaperArchive.com. 
  3. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. §§ L10, N10. OCLC 900162490. 
  4. ^ Google (January 3, 2014). "Overview of BL I-69 in Coldwater" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  6. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 15607244. 
  7. ^ a b c d McNichol, Dan. The Roads that Build America: The Incredible Store of the US Interstate Highway System. New York: Sterling. p. 74. ISBN 1-4027-3468-9. 
  8. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1926). Official Highway Condition Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 79754957. 
  9. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways (1967). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § N10. 
  10. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways (1968). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § N10. 
  11. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1974). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. § L10. OCLC 83138602. 
  12. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1975). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. § L10. OCLC 320798754. 
  13. ^ Google (January 3, 2014). "Overview Map of BL I-69 in Charlotte" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1927). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 79754957. 
  15. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L10. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  16. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L10. OCLC 173191490. 
  17. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1971). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § L10. OCLC 77960415. 
  18. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1972). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § L10. 
  19. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § L11. 
  20. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1988). Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § L11. 
  21. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  22. ^ a b Google (January 3, 2014). "Overview Map of BL I-69 in Lansing" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  23. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (May 1, 1938). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Spring ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ L10–L11. 
  24. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (December 1, 1938). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Winter ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ L10–L11. 
  25. ^ "Michigan Freeway Hits 1,000th Mile". The Milwaukee Sentinel. December 13, 1962. Part 1, p. 12. ISSN 1052-4479 – via Google News. 
  26. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1973). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. §§ M10–L11. OCLC 81679137. 
  27. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. §§ M10–L11. OCLC 900162490. 
  28. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1984). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing inset. 
  29. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1985). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing inset. 
  30. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1984). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § K14. 
  31. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1985). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § K14. 
  32. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Port Huron inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  33. ^ Google (January 3, 2014). "Overview Map of BL I-69 in Port Huron" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  34. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (May 15, 1924). Official Highway Condition Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  35. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1964). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K14. OCLC 81213707. 
  36. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1965). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K14. 
  37. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1966). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Port Huron inset. 
  38. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1967). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Port Huron inset. 
  39. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1973). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Port Huron inset. OCLC 81679137. 
  40. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1974). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. Port Huron inset. OCLC 83138602. 
  41. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1986). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Port Huron inset. 
  42. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Port Huron inset. 
  43. ^ Kulsea, Bill & Shawver, Tom (1980). Making Michigan Move: A History of Michigan Highways and the Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. pp. 27, 30–1. OCLC 8169232. 
  44. ^ Federal Highway Administration (December 4, 2012). "November 13". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing