Intertribal Friendship House

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Intertribal Friendship House
Type Non-profit cultural organization
Founded 1955
Headquarters
  • 523 International Boulevard Oakland, CA 94606
Coordinates 37°47′43″N 122°15′12″W / 37.795229°N 122.253435°W / 37.795229; -122.253435Coordinates: 37°47′43″N 122°15′12″W / 37.795229°N 122.253435°W / 37.795229; -122.253435
Key people Sophia Taula-Lieras, Iona Mad Plume, Janet King, Bonney Hartley, Maria Garcia, Vida Castaneda, Mindy Woolbert
Area served San Francisco Bay Area
Service(s) Social services, education, cultural programming
Mission To promote health and wellness in Native community through traditional and contemporary ways. To promote the ability of Native people to thrive in urban environment. To be a forum for cultural activities and keep traditions intact and alive. To serve as a ceremonial house.
Website www.ifhurbanrez.org

The Intertribal Friendship House (IFH) of Oakland is one of the oldest Indian-focused urban resource and community organizations in the United States. Founded in 1955, IFH was created by local residents, similarly to American Indian Center in Chicago. Beginning in 1952, the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) supported a plan to relocate American Indians to urban areas, further encouraged by the Indian Relocation Act of 1956. The IFH has offered educational activities, elder and youth programs, holiday meals, counseling for social services, space for community meetings, conferences, receptions, memorials, and family affairs.[1][2]

Related Groups[edit]

Organizations and institutions, especially of the San Francisco Bay Area that at some point were or are currently related to or affiliated with IFH include:[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Park, Alex (October 22, 2011). "Oakland’s Intertribal Friendship House will celebrate 56 years of supporting Native American community". Oakland North. Retrieved 12 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Lobo, Susan (2002). Urban Voices: The Bay Area Indian Community. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press. ISBN 0-8165-1316-3. 

External links[edit]