Ionotropic glutamate receptor

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Lig_chan
PDB 1s50 EBI.jpg
x-ray structure of the glur6 ligand binding core (s1s2a) in complex with glutamate at 1.65 a resolution
Identifiers
Symbol Lig_chan
Pfam PF00060
Pfam clan CL0030
InterPro IPR001320
SCOP 1gr2
SUPERFAMILY 1gr2
TCDB 1.A.10
OPM superfamily 231
OPM protein 3kg2

The ability of synapses to modify their synaptic strength in response to activity is a fundamental property of the nervous system and may be an essential component of learning and memory. There are four classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors, namely NMDA receptor, AMPA receptor, Delta receptor and kainate receptors. They are believed to play critical roles in synaptic plasticity. At many synapses in the brain, transient activation of NMDA receptors leads to a persistent modification in the strength of synaptic transmission mediated by AMPA receptors and kainate receptors can act as the induction trigger for long-term changes in synaptic transmission.[1]

This family includes the four regions of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, i.e. the NMDA, AMPA, Delta receptor and kainate receptors.

Human proteins containing this domain[edit]

GRIA1; GRIA2; GRIA3; GRIA4; GRID1; GRID2; GRIK1; GRIK2; GRIK3; GRIK4; GRIK5; GRIN1; GRIN2A; GRIN2B; GRIN2C; GRIN2D; GRIN3A; GRIN3B; NR2A;

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bortolotto ZA, Clarke VR, Delany CM, Parry MC, Smolders I, Vignes M, Ho KH, Miu P, Brinton BT, Fantaske R, Ogden A, Gates M, Ornstein PL, Lodge D, Bleakman D, Collingridge GL (November 1999). "Kainate receptors are involved in synaptic plasticity". Nature 402 (6759): 297–301. doi:10.1038/46290. PMID 10580501. 

This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro IPR001320