Ira Berkow

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Ira Berkow (born January 7, 1940, in Chicago, Illinois) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning sports reporter, columnist and writer.

Life[edit]

Berkow earned his BA in English Literature at Miami University, and his MA from the Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University.[1] [2]

He was a reporter for the Minneapolis Tribune, a syndicated features writer and sports editor for the Newspaper Enterprise Association.[3]

From 1981 to 2007 he was a sports reporter and columnist for The New York Times[4] [5] and has written for Esquire, The New York Times Magazine, Art News, Seventeen, Chicago Magazine, The Chicago Tribune Magazine, National Strategic Forum Review, Readers' Digest and Sports Illustrated, among others.[6]

He shared the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his article "The Minority Quarterback"[7] in The New York Times series How Race Is Lived in America. [8] [9]

He was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1988, "For thoughtful commentary on the sports scene."[10]

In 2006, he was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[11]

Berkow wrote the script for the documentary film Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story (2010) and is the author of 18 books including the Edgar Allan Poe Award nominated non-fiction The Man Who Robbed The Pierre: The Story of Bobby Comfort and the Biggest Hotel Robbery Ever. [12]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

Film[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ira Berkow". Medill School Northwestern University. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Ira Berkow Papers at the American Jewish Historical Society". American Jewish Historical Society. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Sportswriter Ira Berkow Reminiscence". Evesmag.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Ira Berkow". Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Sportswriter Ira Berkow Reminiscence". Evesmag.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Ira Berkow". Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  7. ^ Ira Berkow (July 2, 2000). "The Minority Quarterback". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Ira Berkow". Jewishsports.net. January 7, 1940. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Pulitzer Series". Nl.edu. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  10. ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes | Finalists". Pulitzer.org. February 20, 1988. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  11. ^ International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame (2010). "Ira Berkow". Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Edgar Award Winners and Nominees". Mystery Writers of America. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 

External links[edit]