Ira Babcock

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Ira L. Babcock)
Jump to: navigation, search
Ira L. Babcock
Ira Babcock.jpg
Born circa 1808
New York
Died March 21, 1888
Occupation Physician

Doctor Ira Leonard Babcock (ca. 1808 – March 21, 1888) was an American pioneer and doctor in the Oregon Country. A native of New York, he was selected as the supreme judge with probate powers in 1841 in what would become the state of Oregon.[1] Although the meeting where he was selected did not produce an acting government, this was the first of several meetings that led to a Provisional Government in the Willamette Valley in 1843.[1]

Early life[edit]

Babcock was born in the state of New York around 1808 where he received medical training.[2] He came to what was then the unorganized Oregon Country from New York while working for the Methodist Mission run by Jason Lee.[2] Babcock arrived in Oregon in 1840 aboard the ship Lausanne with his wife and one son.[3] They traveled with Jason Lee’s reinforcements for the mission that was re-located to present day Salem, Oregon.[3] The Lausanne had sailed around Cape Horn and included future governor George Abernethy and the Reverend Gustavus Hines.

Judgeship[edit]

Babcock was selected on February 18, 1841, to be the supreme judge for the settlers of the region.[1] There was a need for a probate court in order to deal with the estate of Ewing Young.[1] Young had become a wealthy rancher due to his economic activities that included participation in the Willamette Cattle Company in 1837. In 1842, Babcock helped to organize the Oregon Institute as a school for the children of the American settlers.[2] After holding the supreme judge title for two years, Babcock took his family to the Sandwich Islands for one year.[3] After returning he was elected as judge again, but left Oregon permanently in November 1844.[3] After leaving Oregon he joined the United States Army and served as a surgeon.[2] In 1870, he returned to Oregon on a visit.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Horner, John B. (1929). Oregon: Her History, Her Great Men, Her Literature. The J.K. Gill Company:Portland, Oregon. 
  2. ^ a b c d Corning, Howard M. (1956). Dictionary of Oregon History. Binfords & Mort Publishing, p 16.
  3. ^ a b c d Flora, Stephenie. "Emigrants to Oregon in 1840". Oregon Pioneers. Retrieved 2007-02-22.