Ira Township, Michigan

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"Fair Haven, Michigan" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Fairhaven Township, Michigan.
Ira Township, Michigan
Township
Ira Township, Michigan is located in Michigan
Ira Township, Michigan
Ira Township, Michigan
Location within the state of Michigan
Coordinates: 42°41′38″N 82°40′7″W / 42.69389°N 82.66861°W / 42.69389; -82.66861Coordinates: 42°41′38″N 82°40′7″W / 42.69389°N 82.66861°W / 42.69389; -82.66861
Country United States
State Michigan
County St. Clair
Area
 • Total 21.6 sq mi (55.9 km2)
 • Land 17.0 sq mi (43.9 km2)
 • Water 4.6 sq mi (12.0 km2)
Elevation 587 ft (179 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 6,966
 • Density 411.0/sq mi (158.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 49001 (Algonac),
48004 (Anchorville PO Box),
48023 (Fairhaven),
48047 (New Baltimore)
FIPS code 26-40920[1]
GNIS feature ID 1626524[2]

Ira Township is a civil township of St. Clair County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 6,966 at the 2000 census.

Communities[edit]

Four unincorporated communities are within the township:

History[edit]

The township was created in 1837 and was named for Ira Marks, an early settler. A post office named Ira was established at a settlement on the north shore of Lake St. Clair in May 1851 and operated until June 1853.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 21.6 square miles (56 km2), of which 17.0 square miles (44 km2) is land and 4.6 square miles (12 km2) (21.42%) is water. Ira township is flat and rises slightly from the shoreline of Lake Saint Clair. Most of the township is rural and made up of woods, open space, and farms. The shoreline is developed along the Dixie Hwy which hugs the shore and there are small clusters of homes at Fair Haven and Anchorville. There is a small industrial area in the northwest section of the township. The primary tributary which is centered geographically is the Swan Creek which branches off to the east and west, out to the north of the township limits. The drainage area of these creeks is small but makes up most of the township's watershed. The shoreline is often sandy or has seawalls along private homes and the water is shallow near the land. There are a number of marshes in the township along the lake and the creeks.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 6,966 people, 2,677 households, and 1,833 families residing in the township. The population density was 411.0 per square mile (158.7/km²). There were 2,871 housing units at an average density of 169.4 per square mile (65.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.87% White, 0.82% African American, 0.63% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.26% of the population.

There were 2,677 households out of which 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the township the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 33.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $45,525, and the median income for a family was $49,741. Males had a median income of $43,472 versus $27,383 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,115. About 7.8% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.5% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over.

Notes[edit]